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Monday, October 4, 2010

The Radish and Green Halloween

If you haven't picked up a free radish at the market, or library, or care, do it! It is full of ideas for living green, and the recipes are wonderful. I use the berry vinaigrette dressing recipe often. The latest issue features green Halloween tips. Here are a couple:

1. There is a recipe for making a safe, chemical free face paint. Since common household ingredients are in it, including cornstarch, food coloring, and diaper rash cream, it's pretty economical, too.

2. Homemade masks and costumes; the author encourages using Good will or hand me downs, making simple costumes [remember the Peanuts gang and what they could do with s simple sheet? ] Martha Stewart always has great ideas for making costumes, too. Cheap, white paper plates painted silver make terrific armor. Don't underestate LHJ, old McCalls, or Good Housekeeping, either. Old prom dresses make great princess outfits; old hats are terrific, too. Loud jewelry and loud sicks add to the fun. Kids can wear crocs when trick or treating as well.

3. For those who eschew candy, no pun intended, there are bags of play doh, stickers, sugar free gum, little toys and other novelites. Whatever happened to Trick or Treat for Unicef? Or, buy old fashioned hard candy, wrapped, at places like Sams or Farm and Fleet in large bags; you can use the rest for Christmas and all kinds of crafts and gifts to be discussed later.

4. For at home parties, look up old caramel and candy recipes, carve pumpkins, with supervision, of course, use dried out plants and twigs for "dead" flower arrangements. If anyone paints, make your own yard decorations from scraps. There are templates, and there is inspiration everywhere.

5. I like to grow my own gourds and pumpkins, though things are slow this year. I do have one potted pumpkin plant blooming; these may be for Thanksgiving!

6. Make the kids color placemats and cut decorations and paper chains from scraps and construction paper. We had quite a gallery on my picture window. Save and re-use what decorations you can, and create instant heirlooms for the next year.

7. Finally, take pictures, with whatever camera you have. The Halloween photos I have from my childhood are my best memories, and they are records of the beautiful costumes my mom used to sew.

8. We also were good at making our own haunted houses, using things around the house. Again, there are a lot of magazines and websites to help. Many are free or cost pennies at local libraries.

Happy Haunting, and thanks to those who follow us!

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