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Easter
Lily in Autumn

Tigress by Ellen Tsagaris

Tigress by Ellen Tsagaris
This is a story of Jack the Ripper with at Twist!

Ellen Tsagaris' The Bathory Chronicles; Vol. I Defiled is My Name

Ellen Tsagaris' The Bathory Chronicles; Vol. I Defiled is My Name
This is the first of a trilogy retelling the true story of the infamous countess as a youn adult novel. History is not always what it seems.

Wild Horse Runs Free

Wild Horse Runs Free
A Historical Novel by Ellen Tsagaris

With Love From Tin Lizzie

With Love From Tin Lizzie
Metal Heads, Metal Dolls, Mechanical Dolls and Automatons

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The Legend of Tugfest

The Legend of Tugfest
Dr. E is the Editor and A Contributor; proceeds to aid the Buffalo Bill Museum

Emma

Emma

Like My Spider

Like My Spider
It's Halloween!

Moth

Moth
Our Friend

Little Girl with Doll

Little Girl with Doll
16th C. Doll

A Jury of her Peeps

A Jury of her Peeps
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Crowded Conditions

Crowded Conditions

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Opie Cat's Ancestors

Opie Cat's Ancestors
Current Cat still Sleeps on Victorian Doll Bed with Dolls!

First Thanksgiving Dinner

First Thanksgiving Dinner
Included goose and swan on the menu!

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Autumn Still Life
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Boadicea
The Original Bodacious Woman

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Angel Monument

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Tuesday, April 30, 2013

Dr. E's Doll Museum Blog: In Memoriam and Happy Birthday Mary Hillier, "Almo...

Dr. E's Doll Museum Blog: In Memoriam and Happy Birthday Mary Hillier, "Almo...: To my friend, Mary, who always said she was almost a May Queen. Her birthday was today, and she would have been 95 years old or so. But, a...

Monday, April 29, 2013

Why we Can't Eat More Kale!

From a student: ‘Eat More Kale’ Company Is Losing Against Chick-Fil-A in Trademark Battle By Caroline Kim | The Exchange – 17 hours ago The U.S. Patent and Trademark Office this week gave a “preliminary no” to Vermont-based folk artist Robert Muller-Moore regarding his efforts to protect his “Eat More Kale” T-shirt business. This ruling is based on Chick-fil-A's claims that the “Eat More Kale” phrase is too similar to its trademarked slogan, “Eat mor chikin.” The legal fight over the “Eat More Kale” trademark between Muller-Moore and Atlanta-based Chick-fil-A Inc. has been going on for several years. Muller-Moore has been selling T-shirts and other items with the phrase for more than a decade. A local vegetable farmer asked him to create three shirts with the phrase, and Muller-Moore continued with the sales as a tribute to local farming. He hadn't even heard of Chick-fil-A until the company contacted him. Chick-fil-A tried to stop him after first finding out about the sales in 2006 but then gave up the fight. That is, until Muller-Moore filed for trademark protection in early 2011. In October 2011 Chick-fil-A sent a letter to Muller-Moore stating that he had to stop using the phrase because it may be confused with the company’s. They also told him to stop using his website, eatmorekale.com. Muller-Moore now has six months to respond to Monday's ruling. "I feel like it’s sad and absurd that the process takes as long as it does," Muller-Moore says. "To me, it seems designed to favor corporations and just roll over mom-and-pops."

Monday, April 22, 2013

Earth Day

Happy Earth Day 2013!

Friday, April 19, 2013

Memoir; Writing your Life Story: Why I Write

Memoir; Writing your Life Story: Why I Write: It was about six or so years ago, and I was trying to enter a writing contest, and a very scholary one at that. It had to do with Virginia ...

Wednesday, April 17, 2013

ICM

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------- April 16, 2013 New Publisher Authors Trust: Themselves By LESLIE KAUFMAN When the Pulitzer Prize-winning playwright and author David Mamet released his last book, “The Secret Knowledge: On the Dismantling of American Culture,” with the Sentinel publishing house in 2011, it sold well enough to make the New York Times best-seller list. This year, when Mr. Mamet set out to publish his next one, a novella and two short stories about war, he decided to take a very different path: he will self-publish. Mr. Mamet is taking advantage of a new service being offered by his literary agency, ICM Partners, as a way to assume more control over the way his book is promoted. “Basically I am doing this because I am a curmudgeon,” Mr. Mamet said in a telephone interview, “and because publishing is like Hollywood — nobody ever does the marketing they promise.” As digital disruption continues to reshape the publishing market, self-publishing — including distribution digitally or as print on demand — has become more and more popular, and more feasible, with an increasing array of options for anyone with an idea and a keyboard. Most of the attention so far has focused on unknown and unsigned authors who storm onto the best-seller lists through their own ingenuity. The announcement by ICM and Mr. Mamet suggests that self-publishing will begin to widen its net and become attractive also to more established authors. For one thing, as traditional publishers have cut back on marketing, this route allows well-known figures like Mr. Mamet to look after their own publicity. Then there is the money. While self-published authors get no advance, they typically receive 70 percent of sales. A standard contract with a traditional house gives an author an advance, and only pays royalties — the standard is 25 percent of digital sales and 7 to 12 percent of the list price for bound books — after the advance is earned back in sales. ICM, which will announce its new self-publishing service on Wednesday, is one of the biggest and most powerful agencies to offer the option. But others are doing the same as they seek to provide additional value to their writers while also extending their reach in the industry. Since last fall, Trident Media Group, which represents 800 authors, has been offering its clients self-publishing possibilities through deals negotiated though online publishers like Amazon and Barnes & Noble, in a system very similar to the one ICM is setting up. Robert Gottlieb, chairman of Trident, says that 200 authors have taken advantage of the service, though mostly for reissuing older titles, the backlist. Another literary agency, InkWell Management, has helped the romance novelist Eloisa James reissue many of her backlist titles, as well as her newer books overseas, this way. She usually turns out her best sellers through HarperCollins, and in a telephone interview she said she would not leave Harper completely because she loves her editor. But she added that published authors talked about the “self-pubs” all the time and had learned a lot from those writers’ efforts. “They treat it like a small business,” she said, “and they are geniuses at discoverability.” Sloan Harris, co-director of ICM’s literary department, said his agency signed a deal with a company called Argo Navis Author Services, a self-publishing service created by the Perseus Book Group, because he decided it was time to give his clients more options than the standard big publishing houses. For certain clients, Mr. Harris said, self-publishing “returns a degree of control to authors who have been frustrated about how their ideas for marketing and publicity fare at traditional publishers.” Both Mr. Harris and Mr. Mamet said that the big publishers focused mostly on blockbuster books and fell short on other titles — by publishing too few copies, for instance, or limiting advertising to only a short period after a book was released. “Particularly for high-end literary fiction, their efforts too often have been very low-octane,” Mr. Harris said of the traditional publishers. Although Mr. Mamet will be the best known of the agency’s clients to use the new service, he is not the only one: two older books by ICM clients that have gone to backlist, “Searching for Bobby Fischer,” by Fred Waitzkin, and “Ghosts of Mississippi,” by Maryanne Vollers, will also be reissued this way. And Mr. Harris said more would come. “We will pay ever more attention project by project, author by author, as to what our options are,” he said. If an author self-publishes, what, then, is the role of a literary agency? Mr. Gottlieb of Trident said it made sense for his clients to self-publish through the agency, which charges a standard commission on sales, instead of going directly to Amazon themselves because the agency brought experience in marketing and jacket design. It also has relationships with the digital publishers that give their clients access to plum placement on sites that self-published authors can’t obtain on their own. Self-publishing services also offer varying levels of editing services, though many writers hire their own editors if they self-publish. Once a small backwater of vanity presses for authors who could not get contracts with mainstream houses, self-publishing now accounts for more than 235,000 books annually, according to Bowker, a book research firm. Big houses like Penguin and Harlequin have opened their own self-publishing divisions because they see it as a profit center of the future. Although a vast majority of self-published books will never find much of an audience, a surprising number have become best sellers, especially in genres like romance and science fiction. Self-published titles made up roughly one-quarter of the top-selling books on Amazon last year, the company said. Argo Navis’s standard deal, for example, allows for publication digitally and in paperback by demand, as well as distribution, in return for 30 percent of all sales. (It would not be unusual, however, for a big author using an agent to negotiate better terms.) The deal also comes with basic marketing, like listings in digital catalogs. “Increasingly, agents and authors tell us they are looking for options, and this model offers them a lot more than one size fits all,” said David Steinberger, chief executive of Perseus Books. With this system, he added, “they make the decisions.” Most top-flight authors have so far eschewed such deals because they are paid advances that are large enough to compensate for lower royalties. In addition, traditional publishers have experienced editors to whom writers become attached, sometimes for decades. And they still provide support services like marketing and publicity, even if these services are sometimes not to the authors’ liking. For these reasons, said Peter Turner, a former publishing executive and founder and chief executive of the industry consulting company Ampersand Publishing & Marketing Solutions, he did not think a flood of big names would follow Mr. Mamet, at least not right away. “It puts so much more of the risk on the author and agent,” he said. Still, with the publishing world transforming rapidly and with more books than ever being sold online, many writers have concluded that they must at least consider self-publishing. For his part, Mr. Mamet cites horror stories that fellow authors have suffered at the hands of publishing houses. He says he has faith that his new book is good enough to sell big, even without a traditional publisher. “I am going to promote the hell out of it,” he says gamely, “even though I’ll probably make my own mistakes.” . . . . . .. . . . . .... More in Media & Advertising (2 of 21 articles) Disney-AMC Theaters Dispute Breaks Into Public Read More » Close

Tuesday, April 16, 2013

A Solitary Daffodil

In the wake of yet another tragedy, this time in Boston, a city I have loved my entire life, I looked out of my door today to see a single, tiny daffodil, not a host, blooming in the chilly April air. April is indeed the cruelest month, and we all seem beset on a global and personal level. Along with the daffodil there is a brazen dandelion, in full bloom, with another's leaves beginning to assault any spare pavement, crack, or garden bed. I keep thinking of Godden's An Episode of Sparrows when I see these little plants struggling to bloom, against odds, in weather that is unseasonably cold and miserable. My mind turned to fairy gardens, though I don't know if I 'll have time this year to make any. I thought of transplanting violets and other small plants that grow native to my yard to landscape them, but I don't know. There are hostas struggling to reach the sun, their little pointed leaves as delicate as asparagus spears. I see green moss, and the grass trying to grow, a few buds on tulip trees, some roses sporting new, neophyte but deadly thorns. Inside, my poinsettia thrives; pansy that languished indoors is holding her own out. The poinsettia is on its second set of leaves; she mocks me. It is the outdoor flowers that must fight this year. I had some old bulbs, tulips given free at the end of last season. I didn't care; I stuck them into pots and ground anyway. The weather is so haunted, anything could happen. If nothing blooms, then the squirrels won't go hungry. I wonder if my pumpkin reseeding experiment will take hold, and if my gourds will find their way to grow and coil again. Little by little, the garden ornaments find their way out of the shed, and their are pots ready to be planted. And all this in light of yet another tragedy.

Sunday, April 14, 2013

Kon Tiki

Sunday Morning featured a story on two new Scandinavian sailor/explorers reprising the voyage of Kon Tiki, the brain child of Thor Heyerdahl, who in 1947, wanted to prove that inhabitants of then Polynesia could have drifted on a raft from Peru to their new home.  He sailed with 4 others on a 45 ' raft, 4300 miles, with a sale that had a Peruvian mask painted on it.  I read the original book in 5th grade, and thus became fascinated with all things Heyerdahl.  I was actively maintaining acquariums, and my love of sea and water was all consuming.  Kon Tiki and The Ra Expeditions seemed to combine all things I loved, and fuled the sense of adventure I had then.  We traveled all the time, by plan and car, and once in  while, took a train ride.  I was ready to go at any time, and my parents were young and healthy, so for the three of us, the world was our oyster, or at least our Ra expedition!

There will be a new film; I can't wait to  see it, and will find the old documentary on NetFlix or Youtube if I can.

Friday, April 12, 2013

Be Spiritual

One of the original 49 tips was to be spiritual, however you define that term. Having read Elizabeth Strout's Abide with Me, I have to say that I found a quote or two that expressed what I felt when I first wrote that tip over 3 years ago. Here they are; The first gives us permission to grieve, and to realize that sometimes, there simply is no closure. I understand that. I grieve still for my Uncle George, killed at 30 in an accident, 40 years ago this June. For so many others, too, for Janet, my 14 Year old friend, who survived so much, do die in a car crash. For my mother, I'll never stop. I wait everyday for something to change, to come home to find her waiting for me. And I know, that as long as I live, I'll never see her again. She lives in memory with me, always. I wasn't always a good daughter, and we didn't have the smoothest relationship, but she loved, truly loved me. I was like her in many ways, and I look like her, and that is a compliment to myself. I sound like her, ail like her, enjoy much of what she did. Yet, she was unique, and brave, and smart, really smart. Everyday, she is with me, but just out of reach. Read below what Strout says; it sums it up-- "Anyone who has ever grieved knows that grieving carries with it a tremendous wear and tear to the body itself, never mind the soul. Loss is an assault; a certain exhustion,as astrong as the pull of hte moon on the tides, needs to be allocated for eventually" (283). I got sick the week she died; I had bronchitis off and on, and other things, through July of that year. My athritic hands developed over that time, and I have full blown asthma. Like she did. There is something to this. And: "Do you imagine that the scientist and the poet ar enot united? Do you assume you can answer the question of who we are and why we are here by rational thought alone? It is your job, your honor, your birthright, to bear the burden of this mystery." I'll fix my typos later.

Sunday, April 7, 2013

Tropical Flowers

From Logees: http://www.logees.com/Angels-Trumpet-Angels-Blushing-Beauty-Brugmansia-hybrid/productinfo/R2314-4/?utm_source=Growing+Tropicals+in+Your+Summer+Garden+-+04-07-13&utm_campaign=Growing+Tropicals+in+Your+Summer+Garden+-+04-07-13&utm_medium=emailhttp://www.logees.com/Angels-Trumpet-Angels-Blushing-Beauty-Brugmansia-hybrid/productinfo/R2314-4/?utm_source=Growing+Tropicals+in+Your+Summer+Garden+-+04-07-13&utm_campaign=Growing+Tropicals+in+Your+Summer+Garden+-+04-07-13&utm_medium=email This is a lovely flower, and one that is terrific for Easter; I am not doing an Ad, I love Logees, but have only been able to order once about three years ago. Still, I get ideas form this and other wonderful books and catalogs this time of year. Growing Tropicals in Your Summer Garden By Laurelynn and Byron Martin Greetings! Tropical plants grown as annuals in your summer garden add plant diversity and grace the gardener with some unusual, eye-catching flowers. Some plants make a bold statement as a focal point in a garden bed or a spectacular stand-alone plant in a container. This is a great way to add dramatic flare to your summer garden. Using tropicals as border plants or filler plants enhances your design and adds color and charm to the garden. Dramatic Plants for Show-stopping Appeal Angel's Summer Dream Angel's Trumpets (Brugmansias) - 'Angel's Summer Dream' is one of our own hybrids and can be grown in a pot or planted in a garden bed near an entryway for its intoxicating nighttime fragrance emitted from its orange trumpet-shaped flowers. 'Angel's Summer Dream' also makes an outstanding hanging basket as well. 'Angel's Blushing Beauty' is another one of our hybrids that has an abundance of pink flowers that bloom prolifically during the summer months. Make sure you grow these in full sun and fertilize and water heavily during the warm days. Thai Giant Elephant Ears (Alocasias and Colocasias) - Another favorite for the summer garden are the Elephant Ears. These large plants can grow 5-6' tall in a single season and their leaves measure 3-4' across. Very impressive! Try Alocasia 'Portora.' Its upright stems and wavy-edged leaves make a bold statement in a garden. Another favorite is Colocasia 'Thai Giant' whose large, rounded leaves measure up to 4' across. The difference between alocasias and colocasias is that alocasias grow slower and prefer drier soil while colocasias grow rapidly and like to be kept moist. I plant a colocasia every year at the bottom of my rain spout so with every good rain, my plant gets plenty of water. Iochroma Royal Queen Iochromas are often called "Mini Angel's Trumpets" because of their prolific, tubular blossoms. Iochroma Royal Queen™ Purple (Iochroma hybrid) is a hummingbird magnet and a welcome addition to any garden wanting to attract pollinators. The purple flowers grow in clusters and will delight the gardener from early summer until frost. Guardian Gate Collection Egyptian Water Plant (Cypress papyrus) - This tall plant with a tufted top makes a dramatic statement as a centerpiece in a container like our Guardian Gate Collection. It grows well near the edge of a pond or bog where there's plenty of water. Hardy Banana Hardy Banana (Musa basjoo) - Our Hardy Banana never ceases to amaze us. Its tropical banana leaf foliage will literally unfurl a leaf a day. Its rapid rate of growth loves full sun, plenty of water and fertilizer and it can reach heights of 10-12' tall in one season. Border Plants For Color and Charm Tropicals can be planted as border plants along a walkway or filler plants in a garden bed or container. I love growing salvias, abutilons and agastaches. Bolivian Salvia Salvias add colorful spires of flowers that hummingbirds frequent. There's nothing better on an early summer morning than watching a hummingbird position its long slender beak into a vibrant flower time and again. The Bolivian Salvia (Salvia oxyphora) with its robust pink color and the Arrow Leaf Salvia with its vibrant blue color are hardy to Zones 8 & 9 and can be grown as annuals in northern gardens since they flower from spring through fall. The spires of color line my walkway and every day during the blooming season, I notice how the colors dance to-and-fro in the slightest wind. Another salvia worth mentioning is Salvia 'Black and Blue' (Salvia guaranitica). It is hardy to zone 6 and winters over well in southern New England. Chinese Lanterns Abutilons or Flowering Maples are reliable bloomers all season long. I keep my abutilons near my walkway because every day a new bell is ringing with color. Whether it's the two-tone color of Chinese Lanterns or the deep red of 'Voodoo' or even the open faced pink flowers of 'Kristen's Pink,' there are always enough blooms to delight the eye. Hummingbird Mint 'Tango' Finally, the Hummingbird Mints (Agastaches) make great filler plants for the garden bed. Some of our favorites are 'Tutti Frutti,' 'Acapulco Salmon and Pink' and 'Tango.' Spires of tall flowers and fragrant foliage make this plant desirable in any garden. Plus, the hummingbirds will visit often. 'Tango's' brilliant fiery-orange flowers make for a sensational show and will keep you entertained from spring to fall. These plants are hardy to zone 5. Feed moderately and keep well watered during the growing season and you won't be disappointed. If you're interested in container plants, click here to be directed to Create Sensational Container Gardens - On Sale Now. This sale lasts through 4/10/13.

Why Life means Never Having to say You're Sorry

See below from a public radio site, npr;

To err is human.
So is refusing to apologize for those errors.
From toddlers and talk show hosts to preteens and presidents, we all know people who have done stupid, silly and evil things, then squared their jaws and told the world they've done nothing wrong.
Parents, educators and even public relations flacks have talked at length about the value of coming clean, and there is abundant research on the psychological value of apologizing. But psychologists recently decided to take a new tack: If so many people don't like to do it, there must be psychological value in not apologizing, too.
In a recent paper, researchers Tyler G. Okimoto, Michael Wenzel and Kyli Hedrick reported on what they've found happens in people's minds when they refuse to apologize. They find that parents who tell their kids that saying sorry will make them feel better have been telling kids the truth — but not the whole truth.
"We do find that apologies do make apologizers feel better, but the interesting thing is that refusals to apologize also make people feel better and, in fact, in some cases it makes them feel better than an apology would have," Okimoto said in an interview.
Okimoto surveyed 228 Americans and asked them to remember a time they had done something wrong. Most people remembered relatively trivial offenses, but some remembered serious offenses, including crimes such as theft.
The researchers then asked the people whether they had apologized, or made a decision not to apologize even though they knew they were in the wrong. And they also divided the people at random and asked some to compose an email where they apologized for their actions, or compose an email refusing to apologize.
In both cases, Okimoto said, refusing to apologize provided psychological benefits — which explains why people are so often reluctant to apologize.
The same thing happened when people were asked to imagine doing something wrong, and then imagine apologizing or refusing to apologize.
"When you refuse to apologize, it actually makes you feel more empowered," he said. "That power and control seems to translate into greater feelings of self-worth."
Ironically, Okimoto said, people who refused to apologize ended up with boosted feelings of integrity.
The researchers are not suggesting that refusing to apologize is a useful life strategy: Okimoto himself said he has little trouble apologizing. The interpersonal benefits of apologizing are huge, and an apology can renew bonds not only between people but also between countries.
Okimoto believes the research, in fact, may provide a clue on how best to get people to apologize. Our conventional approach, especially with kids, is to force people to apologize. But if people are reluctant to apologize because apologies make them feel threatened, coercion is unlikely to help — that is, if a sincere apology is hoped for.
Support and love, by contrast, may be a more effective way to counter the feelings of threat involved in an apology.
The next time junior — or your partner — does something wrong, pass on the stare and try a hug.

Wednesday, April 3, 2013

A Guest Post by the Author of Her Kind

Debut novel fictionalizes the lost great river village of Parkhurst, Iowa Thank you to the incomparable Dr. Ellen for allowing me to share some thoughts about the historical research behind my debut novel, Her Kind, released last month by 918studio. Her Kind is a fictional account of the settlement of the real-life, lost great river village of Parkhurst, Ia., now part of Le Claire (voted one of the “2013 coolest small towns in America” by BudgetTravel). LeClaire historian, Dorothy Lage, first chronicled a narrative history of this eclectic river town with her self-published manuscript, LeClaire, Iowa: A Mississippi River Town (1976). In it, she characterized the attractiveness and functionality of Pau-pesha-tuk, the agitated waters of the big river, a series of rapids that drew some of Iowa’s first settlers after the Blackhawk Treaty of 1832, and later rapids pilots before the lock and dam system tamed this tumultuous stretch of river. The diverse blend of cultures, personalities and vocations led to the establishment of an even earlier set of communities that thrived along this unique stretch of the big river border of LeClaire Township, Scott County, Ia. Lage’s interpretation of the LeClaire oral histories said Eleazor Parkhurst, Iowa immigrant and native of Massachusetts, crossed the river and arrived in Iowa in 1834 from Port Byron, Ill. (est. 1828), and purchased an existing log cabin and 180-acre land claim on the Iowa side of the big river that had been built earlier that year by George Harlan. See this home on LeClaire’s River Pilots Self-Guided Tour. Although reports differ, Parkhurst had arrived to a community of somewhere between 500-1000 Sac natives that resided along this stretch of the river after relocation from their Illinois village of Saukenuk under President Jackson’s 1830 Indian Removal Act. Prior to the Homestead Act of 1862, that clarified property claim rights in the new states and territories, earlier land acquisition claims in the LeClaire area of the Iowa district of the Wisconsin Territory were handled by the Dubuque land office. Parkhurst extended his Iowa land grant west and north along the big river in LeClaire Township, some accounts say as long as two miles, settled the first farm, and built a house from native stone and stucco in 1842. Eleazor Parkhurst then convinced his brothers, Sterling and Waldo, to join him in the Iowa district, and his post office application was approved in 1836 establishing the village of Parkhurst. That same year, Sterling and Thomas C. Eads, who had purchased a portion of Sterling’s property, jointly began to plat out the town of Parkhurst. Surveyors making the original survey of the Black Hawk Purchase in 1837 recorded finding this town in section 85, LeClaire Township, and said it was prospering. Prior to the official Parkhurst plat, another topographer made his way through the Iowa district in 1835 and came across the early Parkhurst settlement. Lieutenant Albert M. Lea (namesake of Albert Lea, Minn.) had this to say about Parkhurst in his self-published work that led to the official state name of Iowa: Of this place, not yet laid out, it is sufficient to say that the site is beautiful, the landing good, building material convenient, and the back country fine. There is nothing wanting to make it a town but the people and the houses, and these will soon be there. Its position at the end of the Rapids will throw a little more trade and storage there then it would otherwise have. A good deal of trade of the Wabesapinica will find a port at Parkhurst; and many persons, emigrating from Illinois and the Lakes, will pass by this route (p. 39). Lea’s book was later reprinted in 1935 by the State Historical Society of Iowa and renamed, The Book that Gave Iowa its Name. In 1839, the Parkhurst post office was renamed Berlin, and Lage and others have noted that this may have been due to the influx of German immigrants within that period. In 1845, the name was changed back to Parkhurst and in 1847, the post office became LeClaire, and the village of Parkhurst became the Parkhurst addition. Get Robin Throne’s Her Kind, a novel free from Kindle April 5-7! She is the recipient of the 2013 David R. Collins Literary Achievement Award, and see why Her Kind readers are giving 5-stars at GoodReads!

Monday, April 1, 2013

Link to Antique Dolls Content

Great site for collectors; wonderful for everyone who loves antiques and dolls. We are basically, writing our own online price guide. http://www.antiquedolls-collectors-onlineadvisors.com/curly-hair-dolls-wmarkings-on-head-and-neck.html There's new information at antiquedolls-collectors-onlineadvisors.com, submitted by folks with the same interest in this topic as the two of us. You can read it here... http://www.antiquedolls-collectors-onlineadvisors.com/curly-hair-dolls-wmarkings-on-head-and-neck.html http://www.antiquedolls-collectors-onlineadvisors.com/no-id.html Feel free to comment on any new contribution. Please tell your friends so they can give feedback, too. And, of course, you can contribute again to antiquedolls-collectors-onlineadvisors.com whenever you like. Your submissions mean a lot to me, and to other visitors to the site. http://www.antiquedolls-collectors-onlineadvisors.com/with-love-from-tin-lizzie-a-history-of-metal-heads-dolls-with-metal-parts-and-automata.html Best regards, Merle antiquedolls-collectors-onlineadvisors.com P.S. You requested this notification when you submitted your contribution. To stop receiving notices, click on the unsubscribe link below... http://www.antiquedolls-collectors-onlineadvisors.com/dyn/C2/Unsubscribe?domain=antiquedolls-collectors-onlineadvisors.com&author_id=21234795