Easter

Easter
Lily in Autumn

Tigress by Ellen Tsagaris

Tigress by Ellen Tsagaris
This is a story of Jack the Ripper with at Twist!

Ellen Tsagaris' The Bathory Chronicles; Vol. I Defiled is My Name

Ellen Tsagaris' The Bathory Chronicles; Vol. I Defiled is My Name
This is the first of a trilogy retelling the true story of the infamous countess as a youn adult novel. History is not always what it seems.

Wild Horse Runs Free

Wild Horse Runs Free
A Historical Novel by Ellen Tsagaris

With Love From Tin Lizzie

With Love From Tin Lizzie
Metal Heads, Metal Dolls, Mechanical Dolls and Automatons

Google+ Followers

The Legend of Tugfest

The Legend of Tugfest
Dr. E is the Editor and A Contributor; proceeds to aid the Buffalo Bill Museum

Emma

Emma

Like My Spider

Like My Spider
It's Halloween!

Moth

Moth
Our Friend

Little Girl with Doll

Little Girl with Doll
16th C. Doll

A Jury of her Peeps

A Jury of her Peeps
"Peep Show" shadow box

Crowded Conditions

Crowded Conditions

Follow by Email

Opie Cat's Ancestors

Opie Cat's Ancestors
Current Cat still Sleeps on Victorian Doll Bed with Dolls!

First Thanksgiving Dinner

First Thanksgiving Dinner
Included goose and swan on the menu!

Autumn Still Life

Autumn Still Life
public domain

Boadicea

Boadicea
The Original Bodacious Woman

Angel Monument

Angel Monument

Popular Posts

Total Pageviews

There was an error in this gadget

Kiowa Doll

Kiowa Doll

Sketch of children playing

Sketch of children playing
Courtesy, British Museum

Daily Calendar

Small Dolls, Clay and Cloth

Small Dolls, Clay and Cloth

A Goddess

A Goddess

Labels

  • I (1)

Search This Blog

Pages

Tuesday, December 17, 2013

Dr. E's Doll Museum Blog: Seasons Greetings, Merry Christmas and Peace in 20...

Dr. E's Doll Museum Blog: Seasons Greetings, Merry Christmas and Peace in 20...: From a Facebook friend; Enjoy!!!

Sauteed Tofu

This was an emergency recipe of sorts. I had to use up the tofu. Some put into hot and sour soup. The rest I sliced into rectangular pieces, and briefly sauteed in two pats butter, about 1 tsp soy sauce, a drop of Sake, and some sprinkled bonito flakes from our favorite Japanese grocery store. The result was very good, added flavor if dropped into the soup, and was very nice on crackers. So, here is a quick hot appetizer for the holidays :)

Friday, December 13, 2013

Thank You RI City Council--Not! or, Nothing runs like a Deer

I'd say they deserve the Darwin Award, but this is not a funny situation. In honor of the spirit of the season, our local city council has voted to give us death and destruction for Christmas. Today, an ordinance allowing deer hunting within city limits went into effect. We have a lot of "city deer" wandering around. To date, I know of know accidents with in the city from hitting them. They are eating a few dead twigs and plants here and there. A couple people claimed a doe tired to paw them; we didn't ask if they had hit the egg nog a bit early or not. I can think of plenty of accidents that could happen with hunters a little to happy to zing that arrow in the sky. Couldn't we have just staged William Tell in one of our local theaters? When we had coyote running around, no one thought to hunt them. In fact, Animal Control was pretty clear they were not responsible for anything coyote ugly or pretty, and they stay far away from all wild turkeys [the bird kind; we can't speak for the bottled kind]. The raccoon population is out of control; they walk brazenly into peoples' houses. Those of us who still have an ounce of common sense think that a bite from one of these animals, especially if they are rabid, would cause more harm than the deer. We have moles and their relatives everywhere, and our yards are like tunnels. Yet, nothing is ever done about these varmits. Really, it wouldn't take deadly weapons to control them. Live tracks do the trick. It's a cold, bleak winter thus far. Not many feed the deer. They will die off naturally. What's worse, we have bow hunters running around. I plan on researching what it takes to get a bow hunting license. Please don't send me angry commnents. Honor the First Amendment, and read on. Killing things is not apparently enough. We have been conducting a new and negative urban renewal policy around here. Lincoln School, a landmark, was taken out of private hands because the owner was not "taking care of it." Ultimately, it was demolished; evidently, taking care of a historic building means introducing it to a wrecking ball. The empty lot where a 100+ year old school once stood is much better. This week, after some sinister machinations and a suspiciously broken boiler, Audubon school was detroyed. There were offers to buy it; the city turned them down. It paid three times as much to have it destroyed. Where did all the Audubon prints inside go, I'd like to know? And where did the Japanese Friendship dolls disappear to? I break my own rule and end a sentence in a preposition to make a point and attract readers' attention. I fear for our Civil War fort, and for the antique statues in Webber Park. Perhaps the Mayor won't like the way they are looking at him. And, speaking of Justice and The Bill of Rights, there are plans to tear down the historic courthouse being laid. They have already been defeated in at least one voters' referendum, but we are persistent in our efforts to make us all one happy big box store. By the way, we are getting our own Walmart. Yet another school building, this one rennovated by a community college, may go bye-bye. The City looks away as businesses here for generations close, and their buildings stand empty. People trying to rennovate old, elaborate structures run out of funds, or have trouble getting money. Strip malls replace history everywhere. We are becoming an urban blight ghosttown as more people move out of our city and into one of the surrounding communities. This is my home, or I would leave. I won't be driven out, though I fear if any of the Council sees this, a little holiday retaliation may come my way. So, thank you Honored Members of the Council for gifting us all with death and destruction this Christmas. Ho. Ho. Ho. Ho. When is the next election?

Monday, December 9, 2013

Fossils

I have always loved old things, preferring them to the new and the shiny. I take it to heart that more and more of our old buildings are being imploded for the sake of progress, The Armory, Lincoln School, Audubon School, The Huber Home, have all been victims. Eyesores, some have called them, dangerous buildings, accidents waiting to happen. History, I say, that will never be repeated or enjoyed again, like the cafeteria on the mezzanine of McCabe’s Department store or the ice cream counter at Pitcher’s on 30th in Rock Island. There are some landmarks, though, that can’t be bulldozed. They will find their way into our consciousness, even in a disaster. Cases in point; the fossils found along the shores of our own Mississippi. Paleontologists will tell you that these fossils, by definition, evidence of prehistoric life, become exposed when the River’s water levels drop, or after the waters of a great flood have receded. See, they will find us, come “hell or high-water.” They also show up where you least expect them; trilobites and fossil ferns showed up in the limestone rock borders of my parent’s garden in Rock Island. Huge rocks encrusted with fossils with exotic names like Cladopora, Cephalpods, Anthozoa, Platyrachella, Productella-they made a home for a water snake that slithered out when I lifted up his rock roof to see the fossils close up. Twenty five years ago or so, they showed up at the gift shop of the Putnam, pre-IMAX, and in the sands near the Cordoba Nuclear plant, where we fieldtripped for Summer Biology in 1975. Our fossil landmarks are far older than the demolished school buildings amid whose walls our teachers first introduced them to us. They hail from the Devonian Period of prehistory, between 410 and 360 million years ago. Appropriately, many of these were marine animals, and fish Later ,the new kids on the block appeared during the Ice Age, the wooly mammoth, giant ground sloth, the land animals, ancient at 10,000 to 2 million years old, but familiar. They coincided with us, with the humans, who learned later to destroy so well. Fossils humble us, these often tiny pieces of prehistory. They have already outlasted us; they lived in some form or another for hundreds of millions years. We have only lived in this Valley for some 10-fiftenn thousand years. If by chance my fossilized remains should survive a million years, and some archaeologist in the far distant future finds me, I hope I have that little fossil fern and the trilobite clutched in my bony hand. And I hope I’m part of prehistory lesson that’s taught in a school that isn’t in danger of being demolished.

Thursday, November 21, 2013

Remembering Dr. Scott as a ‘man of deep passion’ | Augustana College

Since October 3d, I've had four funerals to deal with, five since September.  4/5 were people who died suddenly, and way before their time.  Below is a memorial to a dear friend and colleague.  May flights of angels sing him to his rest.


Remembering Dr. Scott as a ‘man of deep passion’ | Augustana College

Wednesday, November 13, 2013

Original Tips 8, 9, 10

.8. Recycle your junk mail, or learn to use it in crafts or to make papier mache. I bought a gorgeous swan made of tiny folded sheets of paper from the Sunday ad glossies this weekend. Cool stuff, and cheap, and it re-uses things around the house.

I have been huge on recycling lately. Moving does that to a person, and so does creating a new office space. I am designing a cozy "girl cave" solely for writing and personal escape. It can't hurt. 9. Keep a doodle journal for ideas, swatches of color or paint you like, postcards, favorite quotes, ideas for living green, recipes, etc. Let yourself go, and learn to organize by familiarity because you use it often and find great inspiration in it.

I have even found tiny journals on the end of necklaces, especially at places like Michael's that features retro jewelry findings and Steampunk accessories, or at antique shops and scrapbook stores. They make my imagination run wild, and my smallest journal is leather bound and sits on the head of a pin. Like Corey Doctorow, I love books, in all forms, sizes. I heap them everywhere, and have nearly 400 downloaded on my kindle, a small library on my husband's pan digital device, and a sizeable library on Google. Happy Reading, I say. 10. Find some happiness in each day; be grateful, and think, "there but for the grace of God go I."

This has been harder to do for me; times are very trying. I miss my mother; I don't care who knows it. Holidays seem pointless, yet she and I loved them. I keep them up for my own family, but it is hard. Not everyone loves them, and most of us would rather just not bother. I try to do even small gifts for everyone, some handmade. I try to cook and bake special things, but it is hard when I don't feel well and am so exhausted. Fighting all sorts of digestive issues with diet, not medicine. In my past life, my boss and I took on too many malpractice suits. I know too much. I see what happened to my mother. I think everyone should find a good doctor when sick; but, finding a good doctor is getting harder and harder to do Still, I go out and feel the cold, clean air, and see the sun. I work in the yard despite my aches and pains, and I watch my little kittens play, and I know life can't just end. Memories comfort me; the family I have left, the very fact that Christmas does come ever year, along with every season. This Thanksgiving, I will be thankful, even if I can't always be ha

Our Maiden Blog; an Early Gift to our Readers

For everyone who loves and follows Dr.E's Doll Museum Blog, here is a blog for living green on any income level. I call in "Middle Income" because it is geared at those in the Middle Income range, but there are ideas for everyone. I always welcome suggestions. We are family friendly, and give tips for entertainment and personal enrichment as well. For those who love hobbies, there are tips for "green hobbies" and even for collecting and dolls. After all, what are collectors but master recyclers? Please read below:

1. Yard waste and leaves are good mulch; there are various methods to create mulch with them. If you live by ravines as I do, you can rake them to the edge of the ravine to mulch the flowers and plants there and to help build protection against erosion. There are also many craft ideas for yard clippings and leaves including but not limited to:
a. hot gluing twigs to make trees for doll houses nad miniature scenes
b. natural wreathes
c. ornaments from leaf prints, with a stamp made from leaves or from pencil rubbings made from the leave itself, ornaments from seed pods, or dolls and small items including baskets made from woven leaves and grasses, decorated with seeds and small rocks
d. mud pie recipes and mud pies
e. mud clays
f. Luther Burbank experiments for kids who may want to pot a few wild plants, even weeds, and create a garden to observe what they do when they grow.
g. Starbucks gives away bags of coffee grounds for use by gardeners. Take them! They are really great
h. Natural pest control: I buy dried blood at Wal-Mart or local garden centers; it keeps away squirrels who love to dig and also provides good fertilizer.

2. Eat home; pay attention to leftovers and casseroles. Recipes are cheap over the Internet, and are in all kinds of magazines, including The Radish, which is given away. Look for heirloom recipes your parents had, even grandparents and great grandparents, and practice and be creative. The American Women’s Cook Book, The magazines like Everyday Food, PBS cooking shows, Mr. Food, Martha Stewart, and Julia Child are great sources to look. The Discovery Shop and thrift stores are wonderful places to look for vintage and antique cook books, so are yard sales and antique stores, library book sales, book stores and book store chains, catalogs. Many of these are on sale before they are even out of print, including Edward R. Hamilton Books and Amazon and Alibris.

3 Invest in a good library on how to books and books on going green; don’t over look free government publications and consumer reports. Many books and magazines on these subjects can also be found at library sales, and library cafes, where they cost as little as a dime. You can also recycle your old magazines by bringing back the ones you have read and do not need any more.

4. As a family hobby, review pioneer crafts including soap making and butter making. Try making jam or jelly and using canning jars. If you are lucky and have your mother’s or grandmothers’ glass fridge containers nad storage boxes, check to see if they are lead free and use them.

5. If you have wedding china, are getting married and getting china, just like china, use it. Most may need to be washed by hand, but check time honored manufacturers like Palzgraf and Noritake, Johnson Brothers Stoke on Trent. They are often dishwasher save. Take them out even on non special occasions. You cans save money by rethinking dishes on supermarket stamp premiums; there are beautiful patterns including traditional Haviland and blue willow which will go on sale for one to two dollars per pieced at the end of the promotion. Look at thrift stores and estate sales; check to see newer peaces to see if they are only decorative use or dishwasher/microwave save.


These are just a few tips; more to sprout up soon!

Monday, November 11, 2013

An Apologia for Countess Erzebet Bathory: The Mechanical Doll of Polybius and Erzebet

An Apologia for Countess Erzebet Bathory: The Mechanical Doll of Polybius and Erzebet: Legend has it that Erzebet had a special iron maiden, more like a doll than a mummy case, with arms that reached out and hugged its victim i...

Thursday, November 7, 2013

Dr. E's Doll Museum Blog: Our Wishlist and some thoughts on Jimi Hendrix

Dr. E's Doll Museum Blog: Our Wishlist and some thoughts on Jimi Hendrix: As long as the big man in the red suit is coming soon, we will continue our museum wishlist. Wishes are, after all free, and sometimes, the...

Thursday, October 31, 2013

Happy Halloween!

It is Halloween; A Happy One to All, and a Blessed New Year/Samhain to our Wiccan Friends. The Celts are my favorite people, and they have some awesome ritual figures in bronze and stone, including sculptures of Epona. For those who want to read, I recommend the works of Morgan Llewellyn, especially The Horse Goddess, Anne Rice's early Vampire Chronicles, Parke Godwin, and nonfiction on the Celts by Nora Chadwick, Jean Markale, Antonia Fraser and Joy Chant [The Warrior Queens and The High Kings]. The Sci/Fi fantasy of Evangeline Walton [The Island of the Mighty Series], Patricia Keneally Morrison [yes, Jim's widow], and Julian May also satisfy. For myth and legend, there is Bullfinch’s Mythology and my article in a 1987 National Doll World, "The Golden Girls; Modern Celtic Ladies." Halloween is always elegiac for me. My best memories are of carving pumpkins with my Dad, my mom making awesome costumes; a Greek Gypsy when I was 5, a fantastic Raggedy Ann outfit, a Pioneer Girl, a witch, a vampire, my Flamenco outfit, this one bought in Madrid. She was hard to top. We always had the tradition of decorating our picture window, and I had a headless Anne Boleyn cutout done when I was 9 or 10, and dozens of haunted graveyard drawings with Henry's hapless victims looking for their heads. I loved my plastic Jack O' Lantern pails, and my Aunt Connie would send awesome goody boxes with candies and Halloween dolls. My little figural candles were all parading around the house; we had amazing ones on display at our old M.L. Parker's dept. store. My Aunt Rosie would have theme parties for every Holiday, complete with favors and ceramic figures she made. No little girl ever had it better. Now, only my dad is left, and he hates all holidays. We don't carve pumpkins, though I display various varieties. Our kittens limit what we can have inside, so my great haunted houses and witches, my vintage lanterns and ghosts, the skeletons mom and I dressed, all wait for The Museum. I watch The Great Pumpkin every year, as I have since it debuted when I was six. I go over albums of my old cards and take out the carefully preserved, very vintage but well-loved cutouts, some jointed and dressed. I look at the monster dolls my mom used to knit for and dress. I get out the Dia de Muertos dolls and figures, and think of Frida K, who loved dolls as I do. Yesterday, I had to take lunch money to school for my 15 year old. These are harried, forgetful times. My mother taught Spanish there 38+ years, and it was my alma mater, my husband's, my late Uncle George's. My aunt worked for the school district, too, so there were many memories. I lost my mom five years ago, and though I try not to get personal on my blogs, let me say that I will never get over it. When I am in the high school, she is there. I feel here everywhere, and I can hear her voice in the halls. We use to laugh; she was so loud when she taught, that the secretaries at the other end of the building were learning Spanish along with us. I'm loud, too, when I teach, and it is a compliment when people say they can hear me everywhere. :) Our city is tearing down another of the schools where my aunt worked, and where my son attended. I use to go to the frolics there, and knew the staff like family. This Halloween, all is sad but not because of the goblins. I see bits and pieces of my life chipping away, and while I don't feel old, I think perhaps I may be. This is why people collect dolls, or books, or coins, or whatever. Study material culture, and read The Grapes of Wrath. Our things, and least the cherished objects, do matter. They are our memory triggers. Without which, we disappear into the void.

Dr. E's Doll Museum Blog: With love from Tin Lizzie: A History of Metal Head...

Dr. E's Doll Museum Blog: With love from Tin Lizzie: A History of Metal Head...: With love from Tin Lizzie: A History of Metal Heads Metal Dolls Mechanical Dolls and Automatons by Tsagaris, Ellen: New, Softcover, $20.00 a...

Wednesday, October 30, 2013

Memoir; Writing your Life Story: Books Still the Majority and a Question for my Rea...

Memoir; Writing your Life Story: Books Still the Majority and a Question for my Rea...: Today as I was driving to work in the rainy fog of chilly October morning, I heard on NPR that books are still 80% of the publishing industr...

Wednesday, October 16, 2013

The Silence of Driving

Usually, I drive listening to a CD, audio book, or the radio. I lived for Sirius and The Martha Stewart channel, the Halloween and Christmas Channels, The Book Channel, etc. Yet, lately, I can't seem to listen at all. My head spins, or is too heavy. I crack the windows to let in the air that is finally cooler, and I drive. I sometimes feel like I'm on autopilot, but I've always been very good driver, with an fantastic safety record, knock wood, or the dash board. :) I almost grew up in cars, on great roadtrips across the country, into Canada and Mexico, in all kinds of weather. We had one or two "A Good Man is Hard to Find" "almost" situations, but nothing really bad ever happened to us, and we have the great memories and rock collections as proof of our travels. Now, I like to watch the leaves change, and feel the bite in the cool air. It is fun to speculate about the houses and business I pass at different times of the day, and to ponder what goes on there. My best driving skills were honed cruising yard sales; I learned quickly to read maps and plot a route. Now that the "season" is near its end, there will be other adventures to plot. At least, I hope so.

Saturday, October 12, 2013

Red Green; Ultimate Recycler

It dawned on me tonight as I was watching R/G that he is the ultimate recyler, maybe the Rube Goldberg of all recylcers. Where else do you hear someone using the words "duct tape," "manifold," "toilet," and "car" in the same sentence. Whether ridiculous or sublime, Red "repurposes" with a purpose. Tonight he was working on a folk art convention, that didn't work very well, but from the Possum Doll mascots of Possum Lodge to his bent over fat lady lawn ornaments, Red thinks outside the box. The man's prayer is an inspiration to everyone, and some of his props wouild tempt The American Pickers big time. Necessity is the mother of invention, someone said. If that is the case, then maybe Red is the "mother" of all inventors. Don't change, Red, not even if you have to, we guess.

Tuesday, October 8, 2013

Perhaps 100,000 strong!

Thanks to the 10,332 who have read and/or follow this blog. We love our viewers, even if you only visit once. :) For all 8 of my blogs, I am near 100,000 readers or so. Thank you!!!Writers write to be read; this I believe. Money is wonderful; to be able to support yourself and your family doing what you love is a privilege, but it is to be read and appreicated, or even debated, and even scorned---[no publicity is bad publicity!] that writers crave. It is what drives us. I would write in expectation of an audience if only the scorpions and desert snakes were my audience, or even if I were the last person on earth. I read today a headline that as a race, we humans can count our days. I don't know that I believe our days are numbered, or that the world can be destroyed, but I respect Mother Earth. Does anyone really go away completely when they die? Are there remnants and memories of the DNA of lost species, like the dinosaur traits many reptiles share, or the ancient plants that still grow on the earth? Some of us bear traces of our Neanderthal ancestors, and others have collective cultures and memories that seem to predate all time. But, back to the mundane, wonderful world of now. I have a few days off, "three rare and wonderous pearls" as Virginia Woolf would say. I have nowhere to go tonight, except to my family, to cook, to walk later in the cool fall air. It is relief, and much needed.

Monday, October 7, 2013

Dr. E's Doll Museum Blog: Halloween and Dolls and antique Wax Models for Ana...

Dr. E's Doll Museum Blog: Halloween and Dolls and antique Wax Models for Ana...: One of the things I enjoy is posting on Pinterest. I have a Holidays Board and a Doll Collection Board; both contain images of Halloween an...

Finding Betty Crocker: More vintage Betty Crocker

Finding Betty Crocker: More vintage Betty Crocker: Foods Men Hurry Home For! By Betty Crocker recipe pamphlet circa 1931 Any guesses to what menfolk hurry home for? It's mostly cake...

Finally, Fall

We spent part of weekend following a local river for its annual Scenic Drive. Here and there, there were some colors. Mainly, it was still wildly, unnaturally green, a Stephen King landscape for Children of the Corn. It was hot and humid; enough rain had fallen to make everything steamy. The pumpkins and gourds were thriving; all colors, shapes, and sizes, and photos will follow soon. There is pumpkin spice everywhere, but if we want coffee, it has to be iced. Best Halloween decorations? Bittersweet wreathes we made by using our own bittersweet, plucking the leaves, and shaping the vines into wreathes, tied with orange yarn recycled from a knitting project. I read that John Ashcroft makes wreathes from vines and trees in his own yard, and that he and his wife gave them to visting dignitaries as gifts. My fingers twitch to make cornhusk dolls this time of year, and apple headed figures. Some of mine are over 100 years old; they will last that long if dried properly. The sumac is deep red, at least, and cattails and long grasses wave in the wind, while our rural roads are punctuated with bachelor buttons. The cool days are the best; spent yesterday in the cold, putting up more Halloween decorations, and noting what needs to be raked and mulched to the end of my ravine. It helps to build a foundation for the ground. My gincko tree is not gold yet, but my tomatoes and tiny peppers seem to bear fruit now, and one rose bush has a new shoot. One of my pleasures growing up was a rose bush, the last my grandfather planted, that came up in October, blushing red, perhaps embarrased to bloom so late, yet gorgeous. It was over 25 years old then, a late bloomer in more ways than one. Our city deer meaner in our yards, tame as dogs. "Good morning, Ladies," I greet them everyday, and I fear for them. Despite the need to thin the heard, despite their taste for hothouse plants and vegetable gardens, these are my deer. I would let them live in my ravine, and build them a shelter, if it were not for Horrible Harry across the way, who wants all others' yards and ravines, and who hates all living things. Autumn is in the air; I like the chill. I like being cold. I like the colors and the jackets I have to wear. It is puppy weather, as I used to say to my dog, or sweater weather. November beckons. The Snow Queen waits.

Wednesday, October 2, 2013

Memoir; Writing your Life Story: What to do at a Reading

Memoir; Writing your Life Story: What to do at a Reading: I did a reading tonight with some friends at our local library. There is a community program done every year called Read Local. Tonight, I...

Sunday, September 29, 2013

Try to Remember . . .

I will be back soon. I think the phrase or title "Alice experiences Burnout" pretty much describes me these days. This has been a horrific summer for us, and the past month was unreal. I will be back, and will continue to publish again the original tips. When times are this trying, I seek refuge in my books. I read more than one at once, and I think if one is going to write, especially poetry as I do, one reads. Constantly. Good poets are good teachers. For that matter, so are bad poets. There is escape, and comfort, within the pages of a text. I recommend it to anyone who is soul-sick or heartsick. Be well, and I will be back soon.

Wednesday, September 11, 2013

Dr. E's Doll Museum Blog: Why so high?

Dr. E's Doll Museum Blog: Why so high?: As many of my readers know, I publish. I have been published by The Hobby House Press, The Tower Press Mazgzine, Fitzroy-Dearborn/Routhledg...

Tuesday, September 10, 2013

Dr. E's Doll Museum Blog: 9/11 In Memoriam-The Star Spangled Banner with all...

Dr. E's Doll Museum Blog: 9/11 In Memoriam-The Star Spangled Banner with all...: May never forget, may we always have courage, and may The United States always be The United States. To those who lost their lives at The P...

Wednesday, September 4, 2013

Doc Strauss at Rochester College Part 2


An Apologia for Countess Erzebet Bathory: A Jack the Ripper Story: Tigress

An Apologia for Countess Erzebet Bathory: A Jack the Ripper Story: Tigress: Tigress: Dedicated to the memory of our beautiful Emma.

Original Tips #9 and # 10 Use your Good China and Rethink your Wardrobe!

9. If you have wedding china, are getting married and getting china, just like china, use it. Most may need to be washed by hand, but check time honored manufacturers like Palzgraf and Noritake, Johnson Brothers Stoke on Trent. They are often dishwasher save. Take them out even on non special occasions. You cans save money by rethinking dishes on supermarket stamp premiums; there are beautiful patterns including traditional Haviland and blue willow which will go on sale for one to two dollars per pieced at the end of the promotion. Look at thrift stores and estate sales; check to see newer peaces to see if they are only decorative use or dishwasher/microwave save. 10. Rethink your wardrobe. If you have time and are organized, try consignment shopping both as a place to dispose of close, but also to find them. Invest in a copy of W or vogue, or look at the new catalogs, free promotions sent to your home, or just tour the local mall. What’s in style? What’s in your closet? What do you already have? What do you like? Rotate your clothes, think what the dress code is at work; good jewelry, fine and costume, is always in style. Consider having a necklace for everyday of the week that you can wear to coordinate an outfit. Invest in good socks, splurge on a good scarf. If you knit or weave, you can create your own very nice accessories. If you crochet, the possibilities are endless and you also have gifts on hand for Christmas, Hanukah, birthdays and other occasions. If you sew, collect sewing implements, vintage and new, and take advantage of coupons and sales. Yard sales and church sales are good places to look for materials and sewing supplies. Yarn is a good investment, and there are great stores that cater to needle arts. If you read the hobby mysteries, like the Monica Ferris mysteries about the fictional store Crewel World, you will be treated to tips and patterns in every novel. Newspapers often sill include free patterns, as do online newsletters and Internet sites. Etsy.com is a wonderful place to look for craft and sewing supplies of all types. Also, if you sew, consider remaking old garments; use the material for quilts, or make new clothes out of old ones. Old jeans make good denim skirts or handbags, jackets can become vests, dresses can be turned into mix and match tops and skirts, all can become dolls and stuffed animals, or quilts. Some can be made into strips that can be rolled into balls and woven into rugs. My mother made miniature ones by using odd socks and hose that belonged to me in junior high. She cut them into strips, and crocheted them into doll rugs. Very cute. Some old cloth and rags can become homemade paper. [Add ideas later] Hand me downs tried and true; consider them an honor and heirloom, especially for old class vintage items like wedding apparel, shoes from the likes of Ferragamo or Gucci, good persons, antique reticules or hats. If it isn’t’ a sentimental item or family heirloom, you can consign it or you can put it on Etsy, EBay, etc.

We are over 10,000!! Here's a post on not wasting food!!

Stop Wasting Food; See below from Twitter http://deals.ebay.com/blog/stop-of-throwing-out-delicious-food-our-7-top-tips-to-keep-food-waste-to-a-minimum/ Tip #1: Learn Methods for properly storing and using food. There are several ways in which you can store and use your perishable items in a way that will minimize waste. These methods can be used separately, or you can employ several of these in conjunction with each other to truly minimize food waste. • Employ the FIFO method, which means “first in, first out.” This method enables you to make sure that the item you are using first is the oldest, making the risk of something spoiling reduced because you are using the items in order of which they were purchased. • Vacuum-seal food as soon as it’s purchased. This enables you to save extra portions immediately and place them in the freezer. Be sure to label everything—state what the item is and when it was packaged on the tag. You could just freeze your food in regular bags, but removing the air from the bag with a vacuum-sealed helps to reduce or remove freezer damage to foods yielding a better end result. • Use ‘green’ storage containers and bags. These are special bags, like Green Bags, designed to keep foods that are refrigerated fresher for a longer period of time. These should keep your produce edible for much longer than a normal storage bag. • Start preserving, canning, and pickling. Canning and pickling preserves produce in liquid for use in future months, which makes it great for seasonal items you can’t buy throughout the year. Creating preserves, jams, and jellies keeps berries and stone fruits from going to waste, allowing you to enjoy them beyond peak season in breakfasts and desserts months longer than the whole fruit would have lasted. • Dry fruits and vegetables. You can get an inexpensive food dehydrator and create dried fruits and vegetables. Once dried, your produce will last exponentially longer! You can use your dried delights as snacks, or you can use them in soups, salads, sauces, rice dishes, and much more. Tip #2: Buy only versatile pantry staples in bulk. Buying in bulk almost always gets you a better price, but if you buy the wrong things in bulk, it’s a bad value. Celery and tomatoes in bulk are probably a bad idea, but buying in bulk makes sense for a lot of foods, but you need to make sure these foods have a long enough shelf life so you truly have the opportunity to use them again and again. Oils, vinegars, spices, rice, pasta and canned foods are more obvious examples of pantry staples that can be bought in bigger quantities because they last a long time. Dried fruits, nuts, assorted legumes, and other dried foods also have a longer shelf life. Some fresh produce like onions, some hot peppers, and potatoes will last longer and are used often—you can stock up on these because they can stay good for up to a month. Tip #3: Shop for less more often when it comes to fruits, vegetables, dairy, and meat. When purchasing perishable products, buy things to keep you covered for up to the next five days or less. This will lead you to buy less, and while these smaller quantities may cost more per unit, most people end up saving a substantial amount with this strategy because of the lack of regular food waste. Your eggs, milk, meat, and produce will be more likely to be consumed before becoming spoiled or stale. If you have room in your freezer, you may want to still buy some of these items in bulk, but you need to freeze items immediately so they don’t even have the chance to go bad. This might not work for milk and certain items, but most meats and produce will freeze and thaw well. Tip #4: Plan ahead. Create a menu calendar. Plot all of your family’s meals out for up to five days in advance. As you decide what to prepare, take a look in your refrigerator and cupboards—utilize items you already have first to be sure they don’t go bad. Then plan to make dishes with like ingredients so you can limit the kinds of fresh foods you buy, to limit the potential for waste. As you plan, try to utilize any leftovers. For instance, if you make a whole chicken, you could plan on making chicken soup within the next few days, which would allow you to use more of the bird, waste less, and really stretch you dollar. If you make a ham, plan on having ham sandwiches for lunch for the rest of the week! Tip #5: Practice portion control. Usually when folks think of portion control, they think of it as a dieting strategy. Sure, portion control can help your waistline, but it can also be nice to your wallet and can reduce food waste. Start preparing meals according to recommended portions, scaling the recipe to the amount of people in your household. This will let you buy less food, which means there is less opportunity for food waste. When shopping, you may find packages of meat and produce that are larger than you need. Check to see if the grocery store can split up the package. While not all stores offer this sort of service, some will gladly do this for you; shop at stores that do. Tip #6: Think of frozen as the new fresh. Many foods are frozen at their peak, so the freezer section is your friend when it comes to longevity. Buying highly perishable food items, like seafood and seasonal fruits and vegetables, frozen instead of fresh means you can keep them on hand with far less risk of spoilage. This option is deal for people with schedules that make meal planning and buying fresh foods every two to five days difficult. Frozen food often offers a bonus—they usually are already portioned. This helps greatly when it comes to reducing waste through meal planning and portion control, which were two of our previous tips. Tip #7: Experiment with new recipes. As you create your menu calendar, you may be making the same things over and over again because they are what you know. You are using up your pantry staples and hopefully reusing leftover ingredients from other meals, but sometimes you are left with a half container of sour cream, a cup of cut veggies, or other ingredients that you just don’t quite know what to do with. As you plan your meals, keep a look out for these stray extra ingredients and seek out new recipes that use them. Using the internet, you can search specifically for recipes that will use the rest of the beef broth or the last of your carrots and celery. What are the takeaways on controlling waste and eating deliciously? When you put all these tips together, the keys to controlling waste in the kitchen and on your grocery bill are proper storage, planning, and efficiency. Following one or two of these tips can help to reduce waste, and in turn costs, but when you put them all together, you can have lots of tasty eats with little to no waste. If some of this is new to you, don’t worry—you can do it! We’ve included links to three recipes to help get you started. This trio includes some shared ingredients, utilizes pantry strapless, can be pared down to help with portion control, and is otherwise in line with most of our top tips for keeping food waste to a minimum. Side salad: Quinoa Salad with Sweet Potatoes and Apple Full recipe at: http://www.delish.com/recipefinder/quinoa-salad-sweet-potatoes-apples-recipe-fw1112 Check out these ingredients! You will have to buy the greens shortly before making this one, but the apples and sweet potatoes have a fairly long shelf life. It does include quinoa, olive oil, and other pantry staples you probably already keep on hand. Hearty side dish: Roasted Butternut Boats Stuffed with Sausage, Toasted Pasta, and Rice Full recipe at: http://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/rachael-ray/roasted-butternut-boats-stuffed-with-sausage-toasted-pasta-and-rice-recipe/index.html Again, we have a list of ingredients that’s full of pantry staples. It also includes onions and butternut squash—you can buy these fresh and keep them for several weeks to a month before you should expect them to go bad. Dessert: Peanut Butter Honey Brownies Full recipe at: http://allrecipes.com/Recipe/Peanut-Butter-Honey-Brownies These ingredients aren’t healthy, but if you are worried about eating healthy, skip the dessert altogether–that’s usually better for your budget too! For the rest of you, notice that this uses very few ingredients, and mainly utilizes long-life kitchen staples like honey, peanut butter, and chocolate chips.

Tuesday, September 3, 2013

Dr. E's Doll Museum Blog: Doll Pile

Dr. E's Doll Museum Blog: Doll Pile: We have joined Doll Pile, please see the link below! http://www.dollpile.com">Browse My Dolls at Doll Pile

Wednesday, August 28, 2013

70 more makes 10,000 We are nearing 10,000!

We are nearing 10,000! Here is to good living! I have much more to blog, during this up and down, very hectic time. May all of us have peace and joy in the coming months and approaching holidays. Book signings have gone well, and there are several readings planned. Then, I will concentrate on blogging and writing, including the second book of The Bathory Chronicles. A bountiful harvest to all!

Thursday, August 22, 2013

Very near to 10,000 viewers! Some book Previews

From my books, below: Tigress; A Story of Jack the Ripper Who was the infamous Jack, or was it Jacqueline? Was it a group of Jacks? Jack, or Jacqueline, went into the box again, never to pop up again in any one form. The legend fascinated me for some time, until I felt compelled to write about it, only with a twist. In my story, we hear the other side, Jack’s side, only Jack isn’t exactly Jack. Walk with me again through the 19th century streets of Whitechapel. Feel beneath your fingers the crushed velour of The Yellow Wallpaper, and listen to the empty cradles rock against the sounds of shiny knives sharpening, and run, run quickly. There is a tigress afoot, and she seeks revenge, for her, and for her lost children. I hope you enjoy the story, and feel free to comment on this blog or on Amazon.com. The Bathory Chronicles; Part I Travel back in time to the 17th century with the most infamous and most misunderstood lady of all time. Have lattes with Attila the Hun, and be a flower girl at the marriage of Vlad Tepes and Boadicea. What gift to you buy for that bridal shower, and where is the couple registered? Part I of the Bathory Chronicles follows Erzebet, aka, Liz, and her Fey family as they time travel from century to century to help their mortal , clueless friends and family. Part I takes them to a Midwestern Mississippi river town called Rogues Island, where Liz connects with an old love and rediscovers key players from her earlier, more sinister self as Countess Erzebet Bathory, The Blood Countess

Monday, August 5, 2013

Doll Museum: 19th c Folk Dolls

Doll Museum: 19th c Folk Dolls: Our next post or two will dwell on folk dolls of the 19th century. As writings by writers of the late 19th and early 20th centuries show, c...

Original Tip #7; A Good Library of How To Books and #8 Pioneer Crafts

Another Monday,and the rain beats down on our roof as though it would break right through and drown us all. Below are two more of the original tips. When time was my own, I loved browsing how-to books. I found many self-help books interesting, even if they couldn't help me. Dr. Laura's were always the most fun, and there was one about business called When Smart People Fail that gave anyone looking for a job a lot of insight. I love our local botanical center for many reasons, but one is that they have a great library, displayed in a comfortable setting. The books are all on plants and gardening, and are lovely in their own right. What a great place to research this topic, all in one place, where you can sit in style and take notes. I learned a lot about pioneer crafts by making dolls. G. Stanley Hall's 1897 classic A Study of Dolls gives lots of insight into pioneer and urban crafts, and into the creativity of children. Innovative children he studied made dolls out of all types of found objects, including old shoes, rags, and even meat! Corncob and corn husk crafts have origins in Native American and European culture, cf my post on Corn Dollies. Wendy Lavitt's American Folk Dolls is another good source. 7.Invest in a good library on how to books and books on going green; don’t over look free government publications and consumer reports. Many books and magazines on these subjects can also be found at library sales, and library cafes, where they cost as little as a dime. You can also recycle your old magazines by bringing back the ones you have read and do not need any more. 8. As a family hobby, review pioneer crafts including soap making and butter making. Try making jam or jelly and using canning jars. If you are lucky and have your mother’s or grandmothers’ glass fridge containers nad storage boxes, check to see if they are lead free and use them. Martha Stewart's book have great ideas, as do Laura Ingalls Wilder's Little House Books. Local museums and national parts have kits and publications on this topic as well. The Scouts for both genders have plenty of tips for crafts and how-two projects in their manuals and various brochures on earning badges. Joining Scouts or any similar organization is still the best way to learn self reliant crafts and folk arts.

Saturday, August 3, 2013

Holiday Stuff and Green Olive Salad; It's never too Early to Plan!

Thanks to the over 1300 folks who have visited us. I will have some quick holiday recipes and ideas to post, soon. My easieast tip is using prunings from holly and evergreens to decorate simple packages wrapped in brown paper saved from packing materials and grocery bags. They are tied with twine, raffia, or recycled ribbon, and are very Victorian and woodsy in origin.

I made a great olive salad last night from what we had on hand; one can black olives, half a bottle green, stuffed olives, one TBSP. olive oil, one TBSP. olive juice from the green olives, about 1/4th chopped onion, a dash of paprika or pepper, a dash of cilantro, a dash of lime juice. Drizzle with oregano and chives. I also added cut up grape tomatoes and cucumber, but carrots, black beans, or other, similar vegetables would be good. Mix all and chill. Serve cold. If you chop everything into tinier peices, you can have a tapenade.

Enjoy, and more later.

Original Tip # 6; Eat Home-Save Money

Eat home; pay attention to leftovers and casseroles. Recipes are cheap over the Internet, and are in all kinds of magazines with recipes, including The Radish, which is given away. Look for heirloom recipes your parents had, even grandparents and great grandparents, and practice and be creative. The American Women’s Cook Book, The magazines like Everyday Food, PBS cooking shows, Mr. Food, Martha Stewart, and Julia Child are great sources to look. The Discovery Shop and thrift stores are wonderful places to look for vintage and antique cook books, so are yard sales and antique stores, library book sales, book stores and book store chains, catalogs. Many of these are on sale before they are even out of print, including Edward R. Hamilton Books and Amazon and Alibris. I love The White House Cookbook; my edition goes to Kennedy's administration. There are lots of tips, bits of history, and doable recipes. I spent only $3.00 on mine at my favorite indoor flea market. Reprints are nearlt $30.00. Lately, I've gotten good at looking at what is in the fridge and cooking with it. I can do lots with baked eggs and a ramekin. I make all kinds of pasta sauces with bottled sauce, wine, added chopped vegetables, basic white sauce with cheese metled in, canned clams, ground meat, any kind. My husband is great with all types of salads. He makes a mean tradtional French dressing. I'm good with simple buttermilk, sour cream, chives, a bit of may, all blended. I add salsa or tabasco to make it a Southwestern dressing. We find we spend more time together this way, though I admit I hate doing dishes and love going out on busy nights. I've gotten very Zen about doing the dishes, though, and can have dishwasher emptied and loaded in 4 mins. I still prefer washing by hand, and sometimes air drying big pots. I use the dishwasher on plants. Does anyone out there have cooking stories or recipes you would like to share with our readers? I would welcome a guest blogger on this subject. I have not been able to write quite as much; I had my first book signing on my metal doll book last week, and two more signings coming up. My short novela Tigress, based on Jack the Ripper, is also on Kindle, now, and I've been preparing other books for Kindle as well. But,we have had terrible sadness and turmoil. Our beautiful Emma, pictured here, died of feline kidney failure. I can't come to terms with that. My mother's death certificate read the same, though we really had no diagnosis given to us for her sudden death. Poor little Emmie was brave, and endured daily IVs of fluids. She seemed to get better, then weakened. She died in her sleep, in my arms. I had gotten intot he habit of waking up at night to check on her. She had been sleeping on our tub, with a fleece bed at one end, then was too weak to do even that. So, I would pick her up, wrap her in our favorite blanket with a Ceciley Barker fiary on it, and hold her. I feel asleep holding her, and she fell asleep into eternity at about 4:30 am July 22nd. I had to go to work after that. One week later was our wedding anniversary. Then, I had family disasters to deal with as well. I miss my little Emmie, and will never forget her. She was very smart, related to the original Hatfields by a former owner, and fierce as a little tiger. She loved her toys, and stuffed mice; we called them her dolls, and their last name was Mouse. Some spoke French, like Mme. Marionette Toinette Mouse and Mme. Le Pomplemousse. We were over the top for her. We stumbled on two tiny kittens, a girl, Bangles, and a boy, Tuxedo. They now live with us. They are full of energy. I've never had kittens. Emmie was only my third cat; our other two littel boys were elderly when we got them. One passed away in His sleep at 21, the other died quietly at home at nearly 24. They were our Daxie and Opie, and we inherited them. My mother worried for them, and wanted to pay their vet bills, but we paid them. She was cat phobic her whole life. All you had to say was "cat" at the table during an argument, and she would leave. No one knows where this phobia came from. Only she wrote in her memoirs that she had recuuring nightmares of being chased by cats and cows, even though she had a cat as a little girl. Go figure. So, now, we soldier on. Times are uncertain for everyone. That's all we can do.

Wednesday, July 31, 2013

Legally Green [with envy!]

From my A BEE A friends - going legally green. Who knew!? The phrase "going green" may conjure images of tiny ultra-efficient European cars, hemp clothing, and celebrity activists, but for an increasing number of corporations and law firms, "going green" is simply the newest way of attracting clients, cutting costs, and boosting the bottom line. From going paperless to installing high-efficiency lighting, running a "green" office is easier than you might imagine and can pay real dividends for your firm in the money you save on overhead and the clients that are attracted by your policies. Here are a few easy ways you can make your firm a little bit greener (and save some money at the same time): •Cut out the paper. Most lawyers swim in a sea of paper -- printed cases, multiple drafts of every contract, memoranda, and more. Take advantage of the digital age: try to review whatever you can on the computer, limit interoffice communication to email, and when you do have to print, try to print double-sided on recycled paper with a high post-consumer content. •Save energy! Set computers, printers, and photocopiers to enter standby mode when they go unused for more than ten or fifteen minutes, and shut them down entirely (or even unplug them) before you leave for the evening. If you have peripherals (like a scanner) that you use only rarely, leave them unplugged until you need them. Try replacing standard light bulbs with compact fluorescent bulbs, and leave them turned off when you aren't in the room. •Think about the commute. Put together a carpooling group and encourage your coworkers to use public transportation or even to bike or walk to work. Also consider telecommuting a few times each month: not only does it save on the transportation costs, it also cuts down your office expenses. •Do the little things. Bring your lunch in reusable plastic containers; replace plastic utensils with washable silverware; use refillable pens rather than the disposable types; bring a mug to work to use instead of disposable paper or styrofoam cups; and make sure everyone at your firm has a recycling bin at their desk. Remember that these strategies not only help the environment, they also help you: less paper, less energy, less disposable supplies -- all of these changes mean financial savings for your firm. Some Green Law Firm Success Stories •Wendel, Rosen, Black & Dean LLP Read how this 130-employee firm became a certified green business in 2003, and what kind of impact the change has had on their practice. •Nixon Peabody LLP This article explores how Nixon Peabody "went green" when it opened its new San Francisco office. •Farella Braun + Martel LLP Another firm to receive the Bay Area Green Business Program certification as a Green Business. Green Resources •ABA-EPA Law Office Climate Challenge The ABA Section of Environment, Energy, and Resources (SEER) has partnered with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency to launch a program to encourage law offices to take the practical steps towards a "greener" workplace. Law offices that meet the very reasonable environmental standards can receive official recognition from both the US EPA and the ABA. •American Bar Association: The Sustainable Law Office Brought to you by the ABA's Standing Committee on Environmental Law, this site is full of information, tips, and tricks for running a "sustainable" law office. •U.S. Green Builder's Council The USGBC is a non-profit organization dedicated to promoting environmentally responsible building. The USGBC created the Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) Green Building Rating System, whereby building projects (including commercial interiors) meeting certain criteria can receive a "green" certification. •Database of State Incentives for Renewables & Efficiency Need another reason to go green? The Database of State Incentives for Renewables & Efficiency (DSIRE) provides a comprehensive listing of incentives available at all levels (state, local, utility, and federal) to promote green initiatives. The incentives range from expedited permits to grants to tax exemptions. •Association of Legal Administrators - Annual Conference 2007 (scroll down to "Session of the Day") At its 2007 Annual Conference, the ALA hosted a session on "Green Law Firms: Building a Sustainable Future." A brief summary of the session is available on the ALA website along with the handouts prepared for the session. •Treehugger's How to Go Green Guides Recently acquired by Discovery, Treehugger.com is one of the foremost blogs on sustainability and "green" issues .Over the years the Treehugger team has put together a number of practical "How to Green Your..." guides including How to Green Your Work. •Getting Law Firms to Boot Up to Green Law Technology News offers up some suggestions on making your firm's computing habits a little bit more eco-friendly.

Tuesday, July 23, 2013

Memoir; Writing your Life Story: Some Tips

Memoir; Writing your Life Story: Some Tips: I follow ProBlogger; there is a free daily newsletter you can read each day. Take a look at this: ----------------------------------...

Tuesday, July 16, 2013

Super Food Salad; Super Simple Recipe; Super Simple Directions

I found this salad at a local grocery store. It is easy to replicate. Ingredients: Kale, about 1 c. Then, toss and add about 1 TBSP each: grape tomatoes Edamame pomegranate blueberry vinaigrette dressing Napa cabbage carrots, shredded ro chopped cashews red onion sweet dried cranberries It was delicious and satisfying Bon Apetit!

Monday, July 15, 2013

To Help a Fellow Writer

TROTTIES CHOCOLATE MOUSSE 1.5 dsp butter. 2.2 drops of vanilla essence. 3.bar of chocolate. ... 4.yogurt. 5.1/2 cup of icing sugar. 1.Put butter, choc, yogurt, in a china bowl. 2.On Medium for three minutes. 3.Stir in the icing sugar, and vanilla. 4.Put the bowl in the fridge for 3 hours. 5.Et Voila! 24Like · · Share. Teresa Bathan Gamo likes this.. Trotties Amazing 100 Plus Microwave Recipes More free sample recipes can be downloaded at http://www.kobobooks.com/search/search.html?q=Geoffrey+Trott&t=none&f=author&p=1&s=averagerating&g=both http://www.amazon.co.uk/TROTTIES-MICROWAVE-Trotties-Microwave-ebook/dp/B008AUZ0U2 ...See More Search: Geoffrey Trott - Kobo www.kobobooks.com Free eBooks, thousands of bestsellers for $9.99, millions of free classic books....See More. Friday at 11:45am · Like.. Trotties Amazing 100 Plus Microwave Recipes In Trotties Amazing Microwave recipes that are about 20 bread biscuit and cake recipes including french chocolate bread Friday at 1:43pm · Like.. Trotties Amazing 100 Plus Microwave Recipes google trotties amazing final cut to find sites where you can download it Friday at 1:44pm · Like.. Trotties Amazing 100 Plus Microwave Recipes Thanks Theresa tell me what you think of it when youve made some Friday at 2:35pm via mobile · Like.. Trotties Amazing 100 Plus Microwave Recipes http://www.amazon.co.uk/Trotties-Amazing-Microwave-Recipes-ebook/dp/B0086V22CY Trotties Amazing Microwave Recipes The Final Cut (Trotties Amazing Recipes) www.amazon.co.uk TROTTIES ASTOUNDING MICROWAVE RECIPES THE FINAL CUTHas over 400 recipes from aro...See More. Saturday at 4:10am · Like.. Trotties Amazing 100 Plus Microwave Recipes http://www.eatyourbooks.com/library/120432/trotties-astounding-microwave-recipes-the Trotties Astounding Microwave Recipes: The Final Cut | Eat Your Books www.eatyourbooks.com A searchable index of the recipes from Trotties Astounding Microwave Recipes: The Final Cut at EatYourBooks.com. Saturday at 4:13am · Like.. Trotties Amazing 100 Plus Microwave Recipes Trotties Astounding Microwave Recipes - iTunes - Apple https://itunes.apple.com/gb/book/trotties.../id542420206?mt=11 https://itunes.apple.com/gb/book/trotties.../id542420206?mt=11

Friday, July 12, 2013

Doll Museum: The 19th Century Continued - China Heads - updated...

Doll Museum: The 19th Century Continued - China Heads - updated...: Below is my original post; I am updating with some information on the Czech Venus figure, which is the oldest known ceramic object, at lea...

Thursday, July 11, 2013

5.Never underestimate the power of donating and itemizing to charity. You save on your taxes and help ensure your items are not wasted and go to good use. The Salvation Army, in particular, will pick up things, but also uses parts and even broken items to provide work and repair things for other people. Since I wrote this, I encountered other charity shops that will help; DAV, The American Cancer Society Discovery Shops, Annual Sales to aid charities, all give slips to show tax deduction status for your items. This is a proof of donation for the most part, and it is up to you to itemize and value most of the time. We also donate to a children’s school, The Sun Valley Indian School for Navajo Children, Sun Valley, AZ. They send us pictures of the children and an occasional card or letter, which makes the kids in my school group very happy. There are many books and magazines that discuss thrift shopping and donating to charities. In turn, many like to shop these venues as another way of contributing, tax deductible or not. SA and GW often have new items. Club Goodwill in the Chicago area has special incentives and discounts. Their stores are very nicely set up and color coordinated. You might think you were in a boutique, yet their prices are reasonable. If you travel, it pays to go to the local stores. Merchandise is always different and "ever moving." As our friends at Reusable Usables might say, it pays to recycle items as well as garbage and organic substances. Many good clothes can be worn again and again, and many shoes, belts, accessories, and household goods can be repaired. They stay out of the landfill and reenter the stream of commerce to generate income once again. When artists use them to recreate and explore, as our friend Jeanne O'Melia does, they take on a whole new meaning. Collectors have also known this for many years. They salvage the past and popular culture, redisplay it, and say something entirely different to future generations. Their passion fuels everything they do in a positive way and leads to educational and economic opportunities. Our world is full of conundrums these days; we are encouraged to recycle and not waste, but not to collect, lest we hoard. We are encouraged to read, but eBooks and Kindle seem to take the place of print books. Then, we can't recycle the paper in a paperless world, either. Libraries are throwing out books, but with a few exceptions, one can't read an electronic device by flash light or candlelight in a storm. Sometimes, only a message in a bottle will do. Objects are more personal and tangible objects tell stories. Thus, they make better evidence and exhibits in criminal court than many electronic communications. Old buildings are sturdier and can often be remodeled; yet we are in a hurry to tear down and replace with less sturdy structures, thereby affecting negatively our infrastructure. Use what we have; donate where needed, and save by not wasting, overbuying, and deducting. 6. > Eat home; pay attention to leftovers and casseroles. Recipes are cheap over the Internet, and are in all kinds of magazines, including The Radish, which is given away. Look for heirloom recipes your parents had, even grandparents and great grandparents, and practice and be creative. The American Women’s Cook Book, The magazines like Everyday Food, PBS cooking shows, Mr. Food, Martha Stewart, and Julia Child are great sources to look. The Discovery Shop and thrift stores are wonderful places to look for vintage and antique cook books, so are yard sales and antique stores, library book sales, book stores and book store chains, catalogs. Many of these are on sale before they are even out of print, including Edward R. Hamilton Books and Amazon and Alibris. All things in moderation, as Benjamin Franklin wrote and believed. It can be much cheaper to eat at home, and to buy dry staples like flour, sugar, salt, cans, and to keep them on hand. I like to buy spices whenever I see a good deal, I like to shop a variety of stores, including organic and health food stores. I like Aldi, Sav a Lot, Trader Joes, local chains with great deals. I like to buy where bulk is sold; I can experiment with a little of this or that, or splurge. Over time, I've learned that recipes using pasta often work with potatoes like hash browns, or finely cut up pieces, or with rice and noodles. I can layer other vegetables like eggplant and peppers instead of lasagna, or between layers of buttered filo. Butter in moderation is good, and I like I can't Believe it's not Butter. I also substitute olive oil for butter, especially in spaghetti sauce. I like the flavor. Almost anything can be put over rice or pasta and baked. White wine, or even beer, adds flavor and a salty taste. Smoked herring or anchovies added to sauce add salt and flavor, not fishiness. Salt per the CDC today is apparently good for us again. HMMM. If nd vegetables can be added to almost anything, and that they help make it healthy and tasty. I love the MOOSEWOOD restaurant cookbooks. You can add meat to anything, or chicken or seafood, just as many Thai restaurants do. If I eat out, and I do love it, I like to bring home a doggie bag, for dogs, and for me. I try to eat about half my entree, then use it for the next day with a salad. I like to concoct salad dressing with sour cream or butter milk and mayo in equal parts, with about 2 TBSP skim or butter milk. Season or add a touch of any vinegar as needed. A little salsa added in is great, too. Or, add some soy and sesame seeds or a little ginger to the basic buttermilk/sour cream/may mix. You can use fat free, etc., Found over the years that fat free peanut butter has about the same calories as regular creamy peanut butter. So, enjoy yourself but don't overdo. I still love Julia Child and Jacques Pepin for ideas, and there are tons of recipes on PBS.org. As they say in some parts, Jing, Jing! and Bon Appetit!

With love from Tin Lizzie: A History of Metal Heads Metal Dolls Mechanical Dolls and Automatons by Tsagaris, Ellen: New, Softcover, $20.00 at Alibris Marketplace

With love from Tin Lizzie: A History of Metal Heads Metal Dolls Mechanical Dolls and Automatons by Tsagaris, Ellen: New, Softcover, $20.00 at Alibris Marketplace

Friday, July 5, 2013

Tip #4 Recycling Bags

4. Recycle plastic grocery bags; you can return them to the store, or you can use them to pack things, transport things; doubled they make good transport for books and are easy to handle. There are even companies that refine and spin these and other plastic items into materials for book bags, even clothing and shoes. Since I wrote this, colorful and useful bags with logs and designs of all types are popular in mjor grocers like Aldi, Sav A Lot, HyVee, Dominics, and in Marhalls, TJ Max, Barnes and Noble and other retailers. These are made of recyled paper, plastic, and cloth. I have several handmade dolls with long skirts that gather at the end. Plastic bags can be saved inside the doll's skirt. For those who love books, the BN bags that feature Nancy Drew, GWTW, To Kill a Mockinbird, and other books are great gifts. I use some version of these daily for books and other things I have to carry. I also recycle plastic as lunch bags, to carry things, to pack, sometimes to cushion things I wrap and put away. While we never advocate hoarding, we do advocate saving, sharing, and thiking outside the box. In my humanities class, I teach a beautiful film narrated by Max von Sydow called "The Bag." about the life of a plastic bag. It makes one think twice about throwing things into the landfill.

China’s Massive Algae Bloom Could Leave the Ocean’s Water Lifeless | Smart News

Tweeted from Smithsonian.  J and K, remember!


China’s Massive Algae Bloom Could Leave the Ocean’s Water Lifeless | Smart News

Memoir; Writing your Life Story: Delectable Reading and Good Reads

Memoir; Writing your Life Story: Delectable Reading and Good Reads: I am a newcomer to Good Reads, am still getting the hang of it. I actually use lots of social media, and it is a big thing for writers. I ...

Tuesday, July 2, 2013

Original Tip No. 3 Berries and wild plants

3. Plants with fruit and edible berries can be made into recipes. Same with vegetable and herb plants. You can plant an entire victory garden, or make a container garden. Garbage cans for planting tomatoes are popular. Gourds and pumpkins do well in sunny soil and come up more than one year. There is a lot of satisfaction in using gourds, pinecones and holly from your own yard to decorate. Pinecones or gourds in a nice basket make a very nice gift for someone, and pumpkins are great in recipes, especially pumpkin soup, on a cold autumn day. As I look out this year in 2013, I note my wild blackberries have grown rampant. I replanted tomatoes in pots along with green peppers yesterday. We'll see. So far, our rabbits and wildlife have not eaten everything. On a happy note, our baby rabbits seem to have survived, and will live to grow and eat my garden another day. The misery of my Master Gardener Grandpa's planting experience was that the mulberry trees were at the mercy of the local birds. He scarecely got any berries. Same was true of our wild cherry trees; way too high up to harvest, and not a cherry picker in sight. Of course, the crows would have fought us for them, I'm sure. Good sources for more: Any books or articles by the alte Euell Gibbons. Any books or articles by Michael Pollan. Barbara Kingsolver, Animal, Vegetable, Miracle Various articles, shows, clips by Martha Stewart and The Victory Garden on PBS. Logees catalog Recipes.com Your local garden shop for tips. Joanna Fluke's Hannah Swensen bake shop mysteries; she always has great recipes for pies and cobblers. For gourds and pumpkins, try any of The Moosewood cookbooks.

Sunday, June 30, 2013

Doll Museum: History and Chronology Continued: Paper Dolls and ...

Doll Museum: History and Chronology Continued: Paper Dolls and ...: Before I start, let me note that this is the best site I've found for paper dolls and their history, plus it has lavish illustrations; T...

Miss Charlotte Bronte meets Miss Barbara Pym: Ch 6 of my Book on Pym- A Few Green Leaves

Miss Charlotte Bronte meets Miss Barbara Pym: Ch 6 of my Book on Pym- A Few Green Leaves: Ellen Tsagaris Page 1 10/10/12 The Subversion of Romance in the Novels of Barbara Pym The Popular Press, 1998 ISBN: 0-87972-763-2 Chapt...

Saturday, June 29, 2013

Original Tip No. 2 Wintering Plants

2. Some annuals, like begonias, poinsettias, some violas, can be brought inside, or have cuttings taken, or coaxed into going dormant to come up again the next year. Luther Burbank I'm not, yet I have gernaniums and one poinsettia that have done very well this way. I bring in a pot or two every year, and put them in my kitchen sink; I have double sink and don't need both of them. The geraniums thrive this way. My mother had a begonia this way for so long, its teracotta plot rotted under it. She replanted it in the ground in the spring, and took it out again. She was dedicated, though she had me and her house and taught seven sections of Spanish and ran the foreign language dpeartment at our high school. She always looked good, too. Don't know how she did it. I have luck with volunteer plants, too, violas in particular. Pumpkins and gourds occasionally replant this way; I leave them on the ground in our flower bed, even after Halloween. I like to fead the rest to our local animals. By the way, we saved a nest of newborn bunnies this week. Their mother and two other rabbits were guarding them. We set up a homemade hutch of a childs chair flanked by two school band signs. In the center were two overturned metal containers, like a child's bucket only wider. Tis the season. Cuttings are another good way to winterize; umbrella plants and coral bells do very wedll this way. Enjoy the horticulture experiments. There are breat books and sites for these topics, and also your local nursery can help. Bring Plants in; The New York Times. http://www.nwitimes.com/lifestyles/home-and-garden/bring-plants-in-for-winter-but-leave-bugs-outside/article_e75b6596-7784-52ad-899f-d0acf5cafb12.html Bringing Houseplants In for the Winter - 10 Tips for Preparing House Plants for Healthy Winter Living. http://sallystrove.hubpages.com/hub/Bringing-Houseplants-Indoors-for-the-Winter-10-Tips-for-Preparing-Indoor-Plants-for-Healthy-Winter-Living

The Slow Food Movement and Weta

On Ocean Mysteries today, a feature on the weta, a very large cricket that lives in New Zealnd and has inhabited the earth tens of millions of years. I must tell my friend Doc V, a wonderful companion, mother, and entymologist. The weta is about 9 inches long or so, one of the largest insects in the world. He was amazing, and another living fossil. These are the "antique" animals and plants that still live and breathe their stories. Would they could talk our language. Then there are those species that can exist for centuries at a time. If we could be Dr. Who and time travel with them, what would they tell us? What did they think when we humans burst on the scene? Could they settle the dispute over evolution? What were Neanderthals really like? When did war start? Where their dragons and vampires; are zombies possible? I always thought we were simply the authors of our own apocalypse. Along with these musings, I watched Rick Steves on Tuscany and the Slow Food Movement, which simply means it takes a long but expensively worthwhile time to make the food eaten in the region. Cheese begins with raising the right sheep and goats, milking them, heating the milk, curdling it by hand, skimming the curds and whey, pressing them all into molds and aging them naturally. Wine is made in a similar slow fashion, and food is cooked slowly in brick ovens and over open fires. He features the artichoke festival in this episode. One host was an octogenarian vintner who looked sixty. Hmmm? Stress and chemicals anyone? Their take on the truffle snuffing hogs were dogs, and all cattle was free range. Pork and prosciutto came from the native wild boar. Talk about eating local! Our skies are clearing here, the clouds and tornadic winds less menacing. We were all gathered Monday in the center of our building, as tornadoes and storms raged over our area. Once again, we were spared, and old wives' tale or not, I bless the river. We were all lucky this time; our power did not go out. Emma cat is still ailing, but more alert. I have hope this thyroid condition will be under conrol, but my fierce little Contessa Bathory is no super quiet and too compliant. She doesn't want to play with her cat toys and dolls, not even Marionette Toinette Mouse or Mme. Pomplemousse, the string puppet cat toys. They are her favorites. We have done our share of burying young friends and classmates, taken suddenly, or by violence, while still too young. One was only 25, and she was shot by a man she feared for a long time. He claimed it was an accident. She was a veteran, Navy, and was buried, at least with full honors. Seeing her lying in a coffin made life seem very random and futile. I thought of Boethius and his Consolation of Philisophy. I recommend it at times like this. On a happier note, The Creative Writing Primer by the MWWC, our local writers group, is now 2nd in its type on Amazon. Our Kindle giveaway was yesterday. When it is sold, proceeds go to MWWC. I was a guest blogger yesterday on the MWWC Blog. Will post a link later.

Thursday, June 27, 2013

Midwest Writing Center: Happy birthday MWC Creative Writing Primer!

Midwest Writing Center: Happy birthday MWC Creative Writing Primer!:   June 15 is the first anniversary of the release of the MWC Creative Writing Primer , the first ebook MWC Press (2012) released by...

Monday, June 24, 2013

A Kids' Health Mart from The Strong National Museum of Play

Come celebrate the grand reopening of the newly renovated Wegmans Super Kids Market exhibit on Saturday, June 29, from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Help yourself to a generous serving of health-related crafts and family activities throughout the day. Pose for pictures with Bruiser, the Wegmans canine mascot; say hello to some friendly strolling veggies; enjoy health-themed family activities; and enter a raffle to win a gift basket of organic and nutritional health products courtesy of Wegmans. Opening day celebration activities are included with general museum admission fees. Wegmans Super Kids Market is generously sponsored by Wegmans Food Markets

Sunday, June 23, 2013

First of the Original Living Green Tips: Mulch and Uses for the Yard

1. Yard waste and leaves are good mulch; there are various methods to create mulch with them. If you live by ravines as I do, you can rake them to the edge of the ravine to mulch the flowers and plants there and to help build protection against erosion. This is a video, http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HzktwZ3F9agere from YouTube on making mulch for free. Note, not to get too close to the roots, it causes rot. The video tells you how to apply mulch corrctly for various plants. Local papers and catalogs are full of ideas for mulch. Logees. com is a great place to buy plants, but also to get tips. I have posted histories of plants and flowers before on this blog. Tip: Big box stores are currently discounting their summer plants. Many will even be free. Supplies and tolls will also go on sale, as will yard ornaments. Now is the time to look. I had more luck keeping weeds down in my flower beds with miniature rocks covering the ground, but mulch has been a big help, too. Both are attractive. Remember coffee grounds are useful, even if you have to dig them out of your Keurig. Tip; to make Keuring coffees last longer, use a bigger cup! There are also many craft ideas for yard clippings and leaves including but not limited to: a. hot gluing twigs to make trees for doll houses nad miniature scenes b. natural wreathes c. ornaments from leaf prints, with a stamp made from leaves or from pencil rubbings made from the leave itself, ornaments from seed pods, or dolls and small items including baskets made from woven leaves and grasses, decorated with seeds and small rocks d. mud pie recipes and mud pies e. mud clays f. Luther Burbank experiments for kids who may want to pot a few wild plants, even weeds, and create a garden to observe what they do when they grow. g. Starbucks gives away bags of coffee grounds for use by gardeners. Take them! They are really great h. Natural pest control: I buy dried blood at Wal-Mart or local garden centers; it keeps away squirrels who love to dig and also provides good fertilizer. i. Beautiful sculptures of people, and fairy doll furniture are made of twigs, acorn caps, tiny burrs and straw flowers. Corn Dollies, discused in a previous post, are this type of doll. Cornhusk dolls, baskets, and crafts are made of the husks cornsilk, and sometimes cobs, usually thrown out. If you don't want to make crafts with these things, mulch them. j. Sea shells, sea weed, Spanish moss, and dried flowers abound in natural food and craft stores. I love making cards by ironing flowers between sheet of wax paper. I also make wrapping paper with them, book covers, pictures, scrapbook paper. You can also use them to keep a garden journal from year to year. If are moving, you can take it with you, and with some seeds and cuttings, try to recreate your beloved green space. Here is a link by Samantha Greene for drying flowers. "How to Dry Flowers," http://www.proflowers.com/guide/how-to-dry-flowers. Google "how to dry flowers" to find many more links. Here are some more links for ideas for mulch and flower crafts: Green Natural Crafts on Pinterest: http://pinterest.com/planetpals/green-nature-crafts/ Nature Crafts for Kids; http://crafts.kaboose.com/nature-crafts.html This has great ides for recycling, bug crafts, clay, etc. I love the pet rocks idea. Michaels crafts also has great newsletters and patterns for these ideas, and Dover has free sample pages from its books that it will email to you as a newsletter. One member of our local Popular Astronomy Club did a presentation on crafts that teach asronomy to chidren, using ideas similar to these and simple toys. Martha Stewart's Encyclopedia of Crafts is another good place to look.

Share and Share alike

This was a story on today's Sunday Morning, where they are also covering the history of The Good Housekeeping Seal of approval. I used to love the magazine for Christmas. They had the most amazing stories and decorations. I still have the recipe for Christmas cookies made to look like the Baroque angels of The Metropolitan Museum of Art. The sharing story addressed the sharing economy, and featured Silicon Valley. Sharing was going on when I was there 20 some years ago. People share their resources--home, car, clothes, pets, even money, on a rentable basis. I would note that living in SJ and SF was and is very expensive. When I was paying $250.00 and $305.00 per month for an apartment in Carbondale, IL, friends going to Stanford were paying $1000.00 per month for a small, often studio apartment, in Palo Alto. Many professional people making good salaries rented a room by the week, or month, in a private home to live. People were also sharing salaries in Bay Area public courthouses. There is one group featured on SM that allows wealthy people to share their income, and loan out unneeded money to those who need it for bills. Interest is very low. One journalist says he saved $17,000 last year living the shared life. There are websites and blogs allowing people to do this share and swap. Maeve Binchy's Tara Road is based on international house sharing, and as early as 54 years ago, my Mom rented her wedding dress, and brought home scraps. There are shared or rented graves in Europe, and here, you can buy half a marker; one half of the tombstone has one name, the back half has another. Is this socialism? Sort of; except we rent and actually pay money. I have to wonder what happened to "Life, Liberty and Property" as mentioned and addressed in The Constitution, its federal cases, statutes, and treaties, and the 14th Amendment, more specifically. We are encouraging a keep nothing, throw away society. This differs and is a contradiction from sharing and recycling. Also, what happened to giving? For several years, many charities like DAV and The Salvation Army have been wanting contributions. We give money to charities in disasters, now, not so much clothes and food. Sharing is important; I was used to sharing toys and clothes when I was little. My parents borrowed a swing set and merry go round for me from our neighbor across the street, which helped them a lot. But, I think with ownership comes responsibility, and what about privacy? Safety? How many criminals out there prey on those who open their homes and resources in good faith? We have free online exchanges where people exchange goods they no longer what, which is a great idea, a sort of swap meet online. But, along with Craig's List and similar exchanges, let's remember to be careful out there. Emma is better; her thyroid medicine was causing the problem; she was severely dehydrated. She is off of it, and is drinking form the faucet regularly. She is eating with the help of a syringe, six liters of broth at a time. I urge anyone who loves a cat to question any diagnosis involving giving thyroid medication. I will be going back to the 49 original tips for living green, and explain each one with ideas and illustrations in future blog posts.

Friday, June 21, 2013

FDA Food for Thought- Arsenic?! Really?!

Posted by my friend Nancy Ortowski on FB: .. Banned Ingredients that Are Still Legal in the U.S. . . . .By SHAPE magazine | Healthy Living – Wed, Jan 16, 2013 8:21 AM EST.. . . Email Share7005 Tweet Print .... . by Cristina Goyanes Skip these ingredients!You think the FDA has your back? Sure, they recently proposed two new regulations to up food safety measures, specifically how food processors and farmers can work better to keep their fresh products free of dangerous bacteria (remember that killer cantaloupe outbreak from 2011?). But while it may seem like the government is out to protect us from bad-even fatal-food-borne illnesses, which cause some 3,000 deaths a year, they don't completely have our best interest-or health-in mind. "For numerous suspicious and disturbing reasons, the U.S. has allowed foods that are banned in many other developed countries into our food supply," says nutritionist Mira Calton who, together with her husband Jayson Calton, Ph.D., wrote the new book Rich Food, Poor Food due out this February. During a six-year expedition that took them to 100 countries on seven continents, the Caltons studied more than 150 ingredients and put together a comprehensive list of the top 13 problematic products that are forbidden by governments, outside the U.S., due to their detrimental effects on human health. "If you see any of the following ingredients listed on the nutrition label, don't buy the product," Calton warns. "Leaving these banned bad boys on the shelves will speak volumes to grocery stores and food manufactures about what informed consumers simply won't tolerate." RELATED: 7 Foods a Nutritionist Would Never Eat Ingredients: Coloring agents (blue 1, blue 2, yellow 5, and yellow 6) Found In: Cake, candy, macaronic and cheese, medicines, sport drinks, soda, pet food, and cheese Why the U.S. Allows It: We eat with our eyes. "Recent studies have shown that when food manufacturers left foods in their natural, often beige-like color instead of coloring them with these chemical agents, individuals thought they tasted bland and ate less, even when the recipe wasn't altered," Calton says. This may explain why the use of artificial dyes-the most popular being red 40, yellow 5, and yellow 6-have increased five-fold since 1955. Health Hazards: Back in the day, food coloring came from natural sources, such as saffron and turmeric. "Today most artificial colors are made from coal tar, which is also used to seal-coat products to preserve and protect the shine of industrial floors," Carlton says. "It also appears in head lice shampoos to kill off the small bugs." Ingredient: Olestra (aka Olean) Found In: Fat-free potato chips Why the U.S. Allows It: Procter & Gamble Co. took a quarter century and spent a half a billion dollars to create "light" chips that are supposedly better for you, Calton says. They may need another half a billion bucks to figure out how to deal with the embarrassing bathroom side effects (including oily anal leakage) that comes with consuming these products. Health Hazards: "This fat substitute appears to cause a dramatic depletion of fat-soluble vitamins and carotenoids, robbing us of the vital micro-nutrients," Calton says, adding that many countries, including the U.K. and Canada, have banned it. Ingredient: Brominated vegetable oil (aka BVO) Found In: Sports drinks and citrus-flavored sodas Why the U.S. Allows It: BVO acts as an emulsifier, preventing the flavoring from separating and floating to the surface of beverages, Calton says. Health Hazards: "Because it competes with iodine for receptor sites in the body, elevated levels of the stuff may lead to thyroid issues, such as hypothyroidism, autoimmune disease, and cancer," Calton says. That's not all. BVO's main ingredient, bromine, is a poisonous chemical that is considered both corrosive and toxic. It's been linked to major organ system damage, birth defects, growth problems, schizophrenia, and hearing loss, which explains why it's been nixed in more than 100 countries. Ingredient: Potassium bromate (aka brominated flour) Found In: Rolls, wraps, flatbread, bread crumbs, and bagel chips Why the U.S. Allows It: This flour-bulking agent helps strengthen dough, reducing the amount of time needed for baking, which results in lowered costs, Calton explains. Health Hazards: Made with the same toxic chemical found in BVO (bromine), this additive has been associated with kidney and nervous system disorders as well as gastrointestinal discomfort. "While the FDA has not banned the use of bromated flour, they do urge bakers to voluntarily leave it out," Calton says. Ingredient: Azodicarbonamide Found In: Breads, frozen dinners, boxed pasta mixes, and packaged baked goods Why the U.S. Allows It: While most countries wait a week for flour to naturally whiten, the American food processors prefer to use this chemical to bleach the flour ASAP. Health Hazards: It's not enough to just ban this product in Singapore. You can get up to 15 years in prison and be penalized nearly half a million dollars in fines for using this chemical that's been linked to asthma and is primarily used in foamed plastics, like yoga mats and sneaker soles. Ingredients: BHA and BHT Found In: Cereal, nut mixes, gum, butter, meat, dehydrated potatoes, and beer Why the U.S. Allows It: "Made from petroleum [yummy!], these waxy solids act as preservatives to prevent food from becoming rancid and developing objectionable odors," Calton says. A better solution may be natural rosemary and sage. In a 2006 study, some organic herbs and spices proved to be efficient at preventing oxidative decay in meat, which ultimately could improve the shelf-life of these products. Health Hazards: California is the only state that recognizes the U.S. National Institute of Health's report that BHA may be a human carcinogen, a cancer-causing agent. Ingredients: Synthetic hormones (rBGH and rBST) Found In: Milk and dairy products Why the U.S. Allows It: Gotta keep moo-ving things along. Dairy farmers inject cows with genetically-engineered cow growth hormones to boost milk production by about 10 percent, according to Calton. Health Hazards: "Cows treated with these synthetic hormones often become lame, infertile, and suffer from inflamed and infected udders," Calton says. Humans, who consume these cows byproducts, are in no better shape, she adds: "The milk is supercharged with IGF-1 (insulin growth factor -1), which has been linked to breast, colon, and prostate cancers." RELATED: 3 "Healthy" Foods that Aren't so Healthy Ingredient: Arsenic Found In: Poultry Why the U.S. Allows It: Big brother FDA permits arsenic in chicken feed to promote growth, improve efficiency in feeding the birds, and boost pigmentation. "The arsenic affects the blood vessels in chickens and turkeys, causing them to appear pinker and, therefore, fresher," Calton says. Health Hazards: The European Union has outlawed the use of arsenic since 1999, Calton says, and the Environmental Protection Agency classifies inorganic arsenic as a "human carcinogen." Take matters into your own hands by sticking to organic birds only. More on SHAPE: 9 Ways to Get Fit on the Couch 16 Savory Oatmeal Recipes The 10 Best Weight-Loss Apps of 2013 ... . Email Share7005 Tweet Print ...

First Day of Summer and More

Blessed be this first day of Summer and the Solstice. We continue on as best we can. I have much to post, and will begin by introducing a new book, Edible by Tracy Ryuder and Carole Topalian, on eating local all over the country via a lovely,illustrated directory of farmers markets. More about this later. Our cat, our beloved Emma, is not well. She is on thyroid meds, and has had several teeth pulled, conditions she came with when we adopted her. She went from a fierce little tiger, to a little bag of meek, limp marbles. She only wants to sleep in the bathtub, and did want to drink from the tap there obsessively. She is better at that, but now does not have much appetite, and seems depressed. She used to sleep on a her blanket, a baby blanket with another fleece afghan, but she is half the cat she was. Vet says she is fine, but I think her system was shocked. She is around 11 years old. Any ideas? I am more worried that she is not into food, which was not a problem. She ate well and normally, before, and I buy her organic, holistic food, or make it for her. Some publications that fit the season, here are some favorites: Extraordinary Health, volume 17. Drew Barrymore on the cover. Features include RAW probiotics, which one is right for you? and "Eight "new You" healthy recipes. Heatlhy Living, vol. 17, noo. 3: Alanis Morisette on cover. Features: Coffee Bean skinny Pill, Silver Soothese ASthma Syumptoms, What Drug companies won't tell youa bout joint pain, Natural Hari care that performs! The above two can be found at local natural food stores. Design Toscano Catalog special midsummer issue features garden decor, with lots of fairies and animals, as we approach Midsummer and thoughts of A Midsummer Night's Dream! I am not a spokesperson for any of these, but I enjoy reading them, even if I never buy anything. As a writer, I get inspiration everywhere. From the University of Wisconsin Press, several pertinent Land management journals and other journals and books, many delivered as ebooks: Ecological Restoration, Steven N. Handel Ed. Land Economics, Daniel romley, Ed. Landscape Journal, Lance M. Neckar, ed. Native Plants Journal, Ed. R. Kasten Dumroese, USDA Forest Service Also, on NPR yesteday morning was a story called "The Secret Live of Plants," about how hard it is for plants to survive and thrive, and which are good food sources, and what humans can learn about survival by studying them. Try NPR or, All Things Considered to find it. Still working on typing, and my hands and arms hurt more than ever. My books seem to be doing well, and I have some signings and programs coming up. Thanks to all my readers and followers for this and my other blogs. You are my online family, and I love you all!

Sunday, June 9, 2013

New Uses for Water from the Dehumidifier

A very good friend told me he uses the water from his dehumidifier on his fountain. That way, he doesn't use water frivolously. It is that time of year, and I will be looking for a new dehumidifier to protect The Museum. Does anyone have any good suggestions? Thanks. My Book With Love from Tin Lizzie is in print, and available from me, soon to be on Alibris, I hope! Wild Horse Runs Free and The Bathory Chronicles are on Amazon for Kindle! Take good care; thanks for reading my blog.

Thursday, May 30, 2013

Youth Elixir

In doing research, I came across this and had to post it! Youth Elixir Submitted by: ANGEL2ANGEL Introduction Brigitte's Protein Blast Minutes to Prepare: 5 Number of Servings: 1 Ingredients 1 1/2 C. Blue Diamond Almond Milk (sugar free) 1 C. Frozen Raspberries 1/2 Frozen Blueberries 1 Tbs. Body Balance Bio Oil ( a 4-1 Ratio of Sunflower oil and Flaxseed oil) One Scoop of Elite Protein Powder Nano Greens (or any ORGANTIC powdered greens) 1/2 to 1 C. Ice water. Directions Toss All ingredients in blender and blend till smooth...... You can substitute any frozen friut ENJOY!!!!!!!!! It will Keep you young and healthy. Number of Servings: 1 Recipe submitted by SparkPeople user ANGEL2ANGEL.

Wild Horse Runs Free by Ellen Tsagaris on Kindle

Here is my book on Kindle; first novel published this way. It is about the Apache and the Southwest, and the story travels to old New Orleans. See below, first two reviews: Most Helpful Customer Reviews 2 of 2 people found the following review helpful 5.0 out of 5 stars An Excellent Book May 17, 2013 By T Swift This is an excellent book filled with love, passion, history, prejudiced, life in the old West and filled with wonderful writing. I hope to see more from this writer, soon! 1 of 1 people found the following review helpful 5.0 out of 5 stars Horses May 20, 2013 By Frodo Baggins It is all about horses! No I'm kidding. It is accurate historical stuff! Should have called it red feathers! And there is a horse in it! No I kid.

Tuesday, May 28, 2013

This World is not a Conclusion

For anyone who has lost some one; I'm a little late for Memorial Day, but the sentiment counts. I went to HS graduation for my little neighbor, and because my son was playing in the band as a freshman. My mother taught at my HS for nearly 40 years, and was loved and respected as a teacher and administrator. Last graduation I had gone to was mine, and she, and Aunt Rose and Uncle Tony were alive. I felt them there the whole time, especially her, but I couldn't stop crying. There is no closure, only coping. I once vowed never to teach ED again, due to Prof. B, the nastiest woman to ever haunt the halls of Faner, but I've relented since. My friend Heide gave me and all of us this poem at Writers group. It helps. This World is not Conclusion 501 This World is not Conclusion. A Species stands beyond— Invisible, as Music— But positive, as Sound— It beckons, and it baffles— Philosophy—don't know— And through a Riddle, at the last— Sagacity, must go— To guess it, puzzles scholars— To gain it, Men have borne Contempt of Generations And Crucifixion, shown— Faith slips—and laughs, and rallies— Blushes, if any see— Plucks at a twig of Evidence— And asks a Vane, the way— Much Gesture, from the Pulpit— Strong Hallelujahs roll— Narcotics cannot still the Tooth That nibbles at the soul— Emily Dickinson : http://www.poemhunter.com/

Wednesday, May 22, 2013

Dr. E's Doll Museum Blog: The Peter Headed Huret

Dr. E's Doll Museum Blog: The Peter Headed Huret: Good Morning! I am looking for any information and photos about the whereaouts of this doll. It was once in the Maureen Popp collection, a...

Dr. E's Doll Museum Blog: The Legend of Al Capone's Doll Collection; A reque...

Dr. E's Doll Museum Blog: The Legend of Al Capone's Doll Collection; A reque...: Anyone who has information about this legendary collection, please contact me. You may use the emails posted on any of my blogs, or comment...

Saturday, May 18, 2013

Dr. E's Doll Museum Blog: Wild Horse gets five star review!

Dr. E's Doll Museum Blog: Wild Horse gets five star review!: On its first day of publication, Wild Horse Runs Free got a 5 Star Review! Thank you, Tom Swift!