Easter

Easter
Lily in Autumn

Tigress by Ellen Tsagaris

Tigress by Ellen Tsagaris
This is a story of Jack the Ripper with at Twist!

Ellen Tsagaris' The Bathory Chronicles; Vol. I Defiled is My Name

Ellen Tsagaris' The Bathory Chronicles; Vol. I Defiled is My Name
This is the first of a trilogy retelling the true story of the infamous countess as a youn adult novel. History is not always what it seems.

Wild Horse Runs Free

Wild Horse Runs Free
A Historical Novel by Ellen Tsagaris

With Love From Tin Lizzie

With Love From Tin Lizzie
Metal Heads, Metal Dolls, Mechanical Dolls and Automatons

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The Legend of Tugfest

The Legend of Tugfest
Dr. E is the Editor and A Contributor; proceeds to aid the Buffalo Bill Museum

Emma

Emma

Like My Spider

Like My Spider
It's Halloween!

Moth

Moth
Our Friend

Little Girl with Doll

Little Girl with Doll
16th C. Doll

A Jury of her Peeps

A Jury of her Peeps
"Peep Show" shadow box

Crowded Conditions

Crowded Conditions

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Opie Cat's Ancestors

Opie Cat's Ancestors
Current Cat still Sleeps on Victorian Doll Bed with Dolls!

First Thanksgiving Dinner

First Thanksgiving Dinner
Included goose and swan on the menu!

Autumn Still Life

Autumn Still Life
public domain

Boadicea

Boadicea
The Original Bodacious Woman

Angel Monument

Angel Monument

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Kiowa Doll

Kiowa Doll

Sketch of children playing

Sketch of children playing
Courtesy, British Museum

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Small Dolls, Clay and Cloth

Small Dolls, Clay and Cloth

A Goddess

A Goddess

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Wednesday, October 24, 2012

The Yellow Brick Road

My friend's sloping driveway was covered in several inches of glowing gold leaves today. It looked like The Yellow Brick Road. It is 80 year today, and very strange. It looks like Autumn, feels like late May. But, everything is glowing with beautiful death, reds, and oranges, blazing yellows. There are branches outlining the sky, looking like dead hands supplicating heavenward with long, skeletal fingers. There is an elegiac tone to everything. We are gearing up for Halloween, and I am going to make Sugar Skulls for a book group on La Lacuna by B. Kingsolver. I find her and David Abrams to be among the most spiritual writers I have ever read. His "Ecology of Magic" is not to be ignored. I am studying more about another interest of mine, water sustainability and aquifers. I learned that as a result of the New Madrid quake, the Mississippi changed its course. We recently celebrated the anniversary of the loma prieta 1989 quake, which I was in. I still hear the radio playing "Shake, Rattle, and Roll." I have a doll that is a survivor of hte 1906 quke, too. Six months to the minute, on the anniversary of the 1906 quake, we had another major after shock. This was a truly humbling experience for me. I am planning to winterize some of my plants, my Harlequin petunias if possible, my Geraniums, a couple begonias. Many of my plants were eaten or destroyed by the capricious weather patterns. I was reading about Fractals, and how random much of what is really patterned and organized seems. Something I can relate to. The holidays approach; I am looking forward to them, and unpacking old family ornaments to use this year, remembering when all my shopping was done the day after Xmas for next year. I am slowly gathering gifts for our charity, The Sun Valley Indian School for Navajo children, and for my family. Much of Christmas died with my mother, as did all good things, but his year, I feel her spirit in all of this. I plan to bake again, and to store goods for candies to give as gifts. Start browsing craft magazines now, and look for coupons and sales. I love running around Black Friday to taste the sights, but I don't want to have to shop then. I was never last minute. Mom and I shopped ahead, then sorted and labelled who got what. I used to wrap on Halloween night and do Xmas cards over Thanksgiving. My classics were pecan pie, Dear Abbey's recipe, cranberry bread, and mom's Oyster Dressing, with the family joke that they forgot the oysters one year, but told everyone they melted. Mom made baklava and melomakarona, and we ate pheasant, duck, or smoked turkey. I decroated the table with all my little pilgrims and Gurley candles, and we had special table cloths and placemats. Mom made my Halloween costumes by hand, a Greek gypsy when I was five, a witch, a pioneer girl, a Vampire. A Raggedy Ann that should have won a prize. She only bought three costumes for me; Lamb Chop, when I was 3 or so, a Fairy when I was seven because I loved it, and a Spanish Gypsy from Madrid when I was 9, a terrific souvenir I still have. I wore the dress through College for different events and a homecoming float. She dressed the dolls, too, and they often tricked or treated. At 12, we made an Anne Boleyn gown and fantastic paper mask from bags and her old debutante gown. We made cutouts and bought new ones for our window, and got the biggest pumpkins we could out in the country. It was a simpler holiday than today, but we had a wonderful time. Happy Trick or Treating, and Happy Holidays to all.

Wednesday, October 17, 2012

Memoir; Writing your Life Story: How we read Changes Faces

Memoir; Writing your Life Story: How we read Changes Faces: From the newsletters of one of my alma maters; the changing face of reading.  How do you read? The Changing Face of Reading Tonight, wh...

Monday, October 15, 2012

On Autumn from La Lacuna

Below is a wonderful passage from Barbara Kingsolver, La Lacuna at p. 279 about fall, which captures the spirit of the season where, as today, the leaves literally glow, some sporting two or three colors of red, organge and gold: "A glittering shower falls at a slant across my window. Some form of god has come to visit our dark autumn tunnel, like Zeus making himself a beam of light to impregnate Danae. INt his case, ti is not really glittering light but beech leaves. You've never seen anything as dramatic as these American trees, dying their thousand deaths."

Wednesday, October 10, 2012

Dr. E's Doll Museum Blog: The Peter Headed Huret

Dr. E's Doll Museum Blog: The Peter Headed Huret: Good Morning! I am looking for any information and photos about the whereaouts of this doll. It was once in the Maureen Popp collection, a...

Thursday, October 4, 2012

Pasta Libido Putanesca

Yes, this is a real recipe. I came up with it after having dinner at my in-laws for my husband's birthday. He got a card that started "You know you're getting old if..." and one of the answers was "You think libido is a kind of pasta." So, I came up with the recipe below. I hope you like it! My 80+ something in-laws and their friends got a big kick out of this! Pasta Libido Putanesca
One pound fusilli or other very kinky, curly pasta ¼ c shrimp, boiled pink and saucy ¼ c very fresh naked [shucked} oysters ¼ cup green olives with a raving red, spicy pimiento center, Spanish are the sultriest ¼ cup passionately black olives, pitted ¼ c mushrooms, the more magic the better, but any type will work, bottled up, with great need to be released, or canned. 4 oz. marinated artichoke hearts, because your heart will soon be choked up ¼ c Virgin olive oil [but not for long!] ¼ cup tender lobster meat ¼ cup firm, very ripe, blushingly red cherry tomatoes, thinly sliced ½ c Red, Red wine, the kind that goes to you head quickly and makes you swoon Capers, either the kind you cook with, or the kind you will have after you eat this dish One copy of A.N. Roquelaire’s The Claiming of Sleeping Beauty [To browse while the pasta simmers in its own juices]. One good biography of Casanova [To read with dessert} SautĂ© the tomatoes, artichokes, and mushrooms. and olives in extra Virgin Olive Oil. Spice up with ½ tsp. oregano, another tsp. basil, lovingly drizzle to taste with salt and pepper. Add a naughty dash of coriander or fresh cilantro. Add the red wine. Let simmer about 6 minutes on low heat [we’ll definitely turn it up later!] add the Olives and the drained seafood, which has been patted dry, very slowly and gently. Let it all simmer and bubble, but don’t let it boil over [don’t you boil over either!—not yet!] Meanwhile, cook pasta to slight al dente in a pasta pot; drop into boiling water. Drop sparkling shower of Olive Oil into the water. Don’t overdo the pasta! When all has reached its peak, drain the pasta, add to pan with other ingredients, and stir. Then, pour into a pasta bowl, gently toss, sprinkle with cheese and fresh ground pepper. Salt to taste. Serve with liberal glasses of good red wine and warm Italian bread. Serve with a salad of tender greens and Green Goddess. Between courses, recite Elizabeth Barrett Browning by candlelight. Serve on china plates representing Nude Greek and Roman gods and goddesses. Use heart shaped napkins and placemats. Play Johnny Mathis for mood music in the background. For dessert, we recommend Godiva Chocolates, Courvoisier Brandy, and Death by Chocolate soufflĂ©. Julia Child has a good recipe. During dessert, peruse the Divine Marquis’ Philosophy in the Bedroom.
What happens at dinner stays at dinner.

Dr. E's Doll Museum Blog: New Information on a Beloved Book about a Doll

Dr. E's Doll Museum Blog: New Information on a Beloved Book about a Doll: Original Hitty Hitty (short for Mehitabel) is a tiny wooden doll found by author Rachel Field in a New York City antique shop in the wi...