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Tigress by Ellen Tsagaris
This is a story of Jack the Ripper with at Twist!

Ellen Tsagaris' The Bathory Chronicles; Vol. I Defiled is My Name

Ellen Tsagaris' The Bathory Chronicles; Vol. I Defiled is My Name
This is the first of a trilogy retelling the true story of the infamous countess as a youn adult novel. History is not always what it seems.

Wild Horse Runs Free

Wild Horse Runs Free
A Historical Novel by Ellen Tsagaris

With Love From Tin Lizzie

With Love From Tin Lizzie
Metal Heads, Metal Dolls, Mechanical Dolls and Automatons

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Tuesday, September 27, 2011

Doll Museum: Athena and Phevos

Doll Museum: Athena and Phevos: From Wikipedia: Athena" and "Phevos" (Greek: Αθηνά, Φοίβος; pronounced [aθiˈna] and [ˈfivos]) were the Olympic mascots of the 2004 Summer Ol...

Nearly 5000 Strong! and Nightmarish Days

We have nearly 5000 views; let's go for 15,000! Thanks, to the people all over the world who have read my blogs; I have six total, and they mean everything to me, as do you, my readers. I feel close to all of you, and appreciate that of the millions of sites on the Web, you chose to visit mine. Thank you.

I am filled with autumn inspiration, and thoughts of holidays gone by, of my family, of my mother, how I wish she were here to read these entries. Today was nightmarish, but being able to write restores, and clears one's head. Being able to read is even better. Books have always been my friends and my teachers; I encourage others to forge those bonds, and to revere them. My mother had a rule; never throw a book away, and she lived by it, even during the war when she had nothing else.

More recipes, soon. I've been experimenting with potatoes in the oven, and of course, soups and chilis. My mantra is easy and economical. I've been recycling paper, and reusing containers whenever I can, thinking outside the box to find uses for the box. Hope all is well with everyone. Now is the time to get out favorite patterns and recipes, and to come up with holiday ideas. For inspriation, again, Perlman's "The Christmad Cookie Club."

Wednesday, September 21, 2011

Barbara Pym News

News about the society that honors a woman who could take the simple, cozy life and make it glamorous and successful!

The Barbara Pym Society
requests the pleasure of your company for
Afternoon Tea
and a Pym Trivia Quiz
Saturday 5 November 2011
3:00 to 5:00 p.m.
The Church of the Advent
Mt. Vernon and Brimmer Streets
Beacon Hill – Boston, MA
Parking available nearby at the Boston Common Garage
MBTA Red Line to Charles/MGH or Green Line to Arlington
$5 per person if you bring a suitable tea cake, sandwich, or pastry to share, $15 per person otherwise
If you plan to attend, please reply by 30 October 2011 by e-mail to SSShaffer@verizon.net or by phone to Sarah Saville Shaffer at 617-325-9342

‘A cup of tea always helps,’ said Mrs. Mayhew in a rather high, fluty voice. ‘It can never come amiss.’ – Barbara Pym, Jane and Prudence

Tuesday, September 20, 2011

An Autumn Gift; A Cookbook and Craft Guide

My students and I compile theses; I know the photos won't translate, but I will include a few. Some of the receipes are historic, and some are by caterers. Some are mine or my mothers, and the crafts attempt to do a little something for every holiday. I hope you like it. You may print it out; it makes a nice raffle basket gift or stocking stuffer.

Arctic Dairy Cookies



2 c sugar
1 c lard (I used Crisco Cooking Sticks)
2 eggs
1 c sour milk (add vinegar to your milk to make it sour, about a Tablespoon)
½ t salt
1 t soda
1 t lemon extract
4 ½ c flour

Cream lard and sugar and then add the eggs and beat well. Sift dry ingredients and add alternately with sour milk. Drop on a greased pan and bake for 15 minutes.
Frost when cooled.

BEEF BRISKET

4 LBS. BEEF BRISKET – TRIMMED
¼ CUP WORCHESHIRE SAUCE
½ TEASPOON SAGE
½ CUP SUGAR
1 TEASPOON CELERY SALT
1 TEASPOON TABASCO SAUCE
1 ½ CUPS KETCHUP

HEAT ALL SAUCE INGREDIENTS UNTIL THE SUGAR IS DISSOLVED.
POUR A BIT OF SAUCE IN THE PAN BEFORE YOU PUT THE MEAT IN.
POUR THE REMAINING SAUCE ON THE BRISKET.
COVER WITH FOIL AND MARINATE OVERNIGHT. TURN 2-3 TIMES.
BAKE AT 275 DEGREES FOR 4-5 HOURS.
CONNOISSEUR’S CASSEROLE

CASSEROLE
1 12-OUNCECAN WHITE SHOE PEG CORN, DRAINED
1 16-OUNCE CAN FRENCH CUTSTRING BEAN, DRAINED
½ CUP CELERY, CHOPPED
½ CUP ONION, CHOPPED
1 2-OUNCE JAR PIMIENTOS, CHOPPED
½ CUP SOUR CREAM
½ CUP CHARP CHEDDAR CHEESE, GRATED
1 10¾-OUNCE CAN CREAM OF CELERY SOUP
½ TEASPOON SALT
½ TEASPOON PEPPER

TOPPING
1 CUP RITZ CRACKER CRUMBS
½ STICK BUTTER, MELTED
½ CUP SLIVERED ALMONDS

MIX ALL INGREDIENTS EXCEPT TOPPING. PLACE IN A 1½ -QUART CASSEROLE. SPRINKLE TOPPING OVER CASSEROLE. BAKE AT 350 DEGREES FOR 45 MINUTES.

EASY FRESH PEACH COBBLER
2 CUPS PEACHES, PEELED AND SLICED
½ CUP SUGAR
1 STICK BUTTER
1 CUP SUGAR
½ CUP MILK
1 CUP PLAIN FLOUR, SIFTED
1½ TEASPOONS BAKING POWDER
PINCH OF SALT

MIX PEACHES WITH ½ CUP SUGAR. LET STAND FOR 30 MINUTES OR UNTIL JUICE FORMS. MELT BUTTER IN 2 QUART BAKING DISH. MAKE BATTER OF REMAINING INGREDIENTS. POUR BATTER OVER BUTTER, AND THEN POUR FRUIT AND JUICE OVER BATTER. DO NOT STIR!!! BAKE AT 350 DEGREES FOR 30-45 MINUTES OR UNTIL BROWN.

FUDGE
4 ½ CUPS WHITE SUGAR 1½ BAGS OF SEMI-SWEET CHOCOLATE CHIPS
1 12-OZ. EVAPORATED MILK 10-OZ. FLUFF OR MARSHMELLOW CREME
½ CUP BUTTER 1 CUP CHOPPED WALNUTS (OPTIONAL)
1 11½-OZ. BAG OF MILK CHOCOLATE CHIPS 1 TEASPOON VANILLA

MIX CHIPS, FLUFF AND NUTS IN LARGE BOWL. SET ASIDE. BUTTER BOTTOM OF JELLY ROLL PAN OR LARGE CAKE PAN. PUT SUGAR, BUTTER, MILK, AND VANILLA IN LARGE PAN. BRING TO A BOIL. TURN DOWN SO IT IS A NICE ROLLING BOIL. COOK 5 MINUTES, STIRRING CONSTANTLY. POUR OVER SHIP MIXTURE UNTIL MELTED AND WELL MIXED. POUR INTO PAN AND LET COOL.

LOVE NOTES (LEMON BARS)

CRUST:
2 CUPS PLAIN FLOUR, SIFTED
½ CUP 4X POWDERED SUGAR
1 CUP BUTTER
TOPPING:
4 EGGS, SLIGHTLY BEATEN
2 CUPS GRANULATED SUGAR
6 TABLESPOONS LEMON JUICE
1 TEASPOON BAKING POWDER
¼ CUP PLAIN FLOUR

CRUST:
CUT FLOUR AND POWDERED SUGAR INTO BUTTER UNTIL MIXTURE CLINGS TOGETHER. PRESS DOUGH INTO A 13x9 INCH BAKING PAN. BAKE AT 350 DEGREES FOR 25 MINUTES. COOL TO ROOM TEMPERATURE BEFORE PUTTING ON THE TOPPING. THIS IS ESSENTIAL FOR A CRISP CRUST.

TOPPING:
MIX EGGS, SUGAR AND LEMON JUICE TOGETHER. WHEN WELL BLENDED, ADD REMAINING INGREDIENTS. MIX WELL. POUR OVER BAKED CRUST. BAKE AT 350 DEGREES FOR 25 MINUTES. SPRINKLE WITH POWDERED SUGAR. COOL COMPLETELY, AND THEN CUT INTO BARS.
INGREDIENTS
Serves 4.
• Coarse salt and ground pepper
• 1/4 cup all-purpose flour
• 8 thin chicken cutlets (about 1 1/2 pounds total)
• 2 tablespoons olive oil
• 1 cup reduced-sodium chicken broth
• 1 can (14 ounces) artichoke hearts packed in water, rinsed, drained, and quartered
• 2 tablespoons rinsed and drained capers
• 2 tablespoons butter
• 8 ounces angel-hair pasta
• 1/2 cup parsley leaves DIRECTIONS
1. Set a large pot of salted water to boil. Place flour in a shallow dish, and season with salt and pepper. Dredge cutlets, shaking off excess. In a large skillet, heat 1 tablespoon oil over medium-high. Cook chicken in batches, adding remaining oil as needed, until light golden, 1 to 3 minutes per side; transfer to a dish.

2. Add broth to skillet, and bring to a boil; cook until reduced by half. Add artichokes, capers, and the chicken with any juices. Gently swirl to combine, and bring just to a boil. Remove skillet from heat. Swirl in butter, and cover to keep warm.

3. Add pasta to boiling water. Cook until al dente; drain. Serve chicken and sauce over pasta, topped with parsley.


NORWEGIAN KRINGLAR

PART ONE:

MIX LIKE PIE CRUST: 1 CUP FLOUR
½ CUP BUTTER
1 TABLESPOON WATER
PAT ON COOKIE SHEET IN TWO LONG STRIPS, 3” WIDE

PART TWO:

PUT IN SAUCEPAN: 1 CUP WATER
½ CUP BUTTER

HEAT TO BOILING POINT, AS YOU TAKE FROM STOVE, ADD 1 CUP FLOUR

STIR UNTIL SMOOTH. BEAT IN, ONE AT A TIME, 3 EGGS, BEATING UNTIL SMOOTH. AFTER EACH ADDITION AND ½ TEASPOON VANILLA EXTRACT. SPREAD LIGHTLY ON PART ONE. BAKE AT 375 DEGREES FOR 45 MINUTES.

PART THREE:

FROST WITH: 2 CUPS POWDERED SUGAR
2 TABLESPOONS CREAM
2 TABLESPOONS BUTTER
1 TEASPOON VANILLA EXTRACT

POTATO CASSEROLE

2 LBS. FROZEN HASH BROWNS 1 TSP. GARLIC SALT
1 PINT SOUR CREAM 1 TSP. SALT
8 OZ. SHREDDED SHARP CHEDDAR CHEESE 1 TSP. PEPPER
1 CAN UNDILUTED CREAM OF CHICKEN SOUP 1 STICK BUTTER, MELTED
½ CUP DICED ONION 4 CUPS CORNFLAKES

MIX ALL INGREDIENTS EXCEPT BUTTER AND CORNFLAKES. PUT INTO GREASED PAN, 9x13. COMINE THE CORNFLAKES AND BUTTER. SPREAD ON TOP. BAKE 75 MINUTES AT 350 DEGREES.


Recipe: Beef Stir-Fry with Mushrooms and Spinach

Servings: 4
Preparation Time: 10 min.
Cooking Time: 10 min.

Ingredients:
• 1 bag porcini mushrooms
• 3 Tbs. lite soy sauce, plus more for serving
• 1 Tbs. cornstarch
• 1 Tbs. dry sherry or Chinese rice wine (optional)
• 1 tsp. sugar
• 1 Lbs. boneless sirloin steak, thinly sliced across the grain
• 2 tsp. vegetable oil
• 2 tsp. Oriental sesame oil
• 2 tsp. fresh ginger, minced
• 1 clove garlic, minced
• 1 cup scallions, chopped
• 1/3 Lbs. spinach\cooked, washed, tough stems discarded
Cooking Directions:
Cover mushrooms with hot water in a bowl. Let soak 15 minutes. Drain, reserving liquid. Rinse mushrooms under running water. Pat dry and slice. Set aside. Combine next 4 ingredients in a jar with a tight-fitting lid. Shake vigorously. Place sliced steak in a mixing bowl. Pour marinade over steak and toss to coat. Heat vegetable oil and sesame oil in a wok or heavy nonstick skillet over high heat. Stir-fry ginger and garlic 45 seconds. Add steak and marinade and stir-fry 2 minutes or until steak begins to brown. Add scallions and mushrooms and stir-fry 2 minutes or until scallions are softened. Add spinach and reserved mushroom soaking liquid. Stir-fry another 45 seconds. Season to taste with pepper. Serve with additional soy sauce

Per Serving: calories 310, fat 14.3g, calories from fat 42%, protein 37.0g, cholesterol 100.9mg, dietary fiber 1.8g

Nutrients Exchanges
Calories 310 Milk Exchanges 0.0
Protein 37.0g Vegetable Exchanges 0.8
Carbohydrates 8.5g Fruit Exchanges 0.0
Dietary Fiber 1.8g Bread Exchanges 0.1
Sugar 1.9g Other Carbohydrates/Sugar Exchanges 0.1
Fat Total 14.3g Lean Meat Exchanges 0.0
Saturated Fat 4.9g Very Lean Meat/Protein Exchanges 4.5
Mono-unsaturated Fat 6.2g Fat Exchanges 2.1
Poly-unsaturated Fat 3.3g
% Calories from Fat 42%
Cholesterol 100.9mg
Sodium 509.2mg
Vitamins Minerals
Vitamin A 358.0IU Calcium 92.3mg
Thiamin (B1) 0.8mg Copper 0.6mg
Riboflavin (B2) 0.7mg Iron 6.0mg
Niacin (B3) 5.7mg Magnesium 84.3mg
Vitamin B6 0.8mg Manganese 0.7mg
Vitamin B12 3.2mcg Phosphorus 327.6mg
Vitamin C 9.2mg Potassium 767.8mg
Vitamin E 2.5IU Selenium 38.3mcg
Folate 93.0mcg Sodium 509.2mg
Pantothenic Acid 0.9mg Zinc 8.0mg



________________________________________

Wednesday, September 14, 2011

Chilly Weather, a Red Maple, and some Poems

Flowers for me today. I needed some cash, so off to the grocery store I trotted. The air was really chilly, and I loved it. There was a raindrop or too coyly kissing my face, and the breeze was actually cold. I wanted to feel cold, and I welcomed the little shiver and slight goosebumps on my bare legs. It was 90 one day last week, and the 80s held on, much like disco and the year, as if they would never die.

My plack pansies and petunias are thriving, and the black hollyhocks are coming up. We fired squash blossms last week for dinner, and harvested our first gourds. I am hoping my pumpkins will bloom by the end of October. Halloween is beginning to haunt the stores. I love just looking at the displays, and eventually, choosing one or two things for our decorations, though more and more, I like to make them, or use natural objects. With all my collections, I admit decorating space is at a premium, but a little dusting, rearranging, and a pumpkin or witch strategically placed is very cheery.

Today, I bought two carnations, one all magenta, one white with magenta edges and speckles. They were really beautiful, and 75 cents each. Once in a while, there is a cheap thrill worth having.

I am in the mood for soups. I find simmering them very comforting. I have made some good ones very quickly. Last week, I combined a 12 oz can of black beans with the 12 oz can of chicken noodle, any brand, added about 1/4 c diced/chili-lime tomatoes, a little pepper, fresh lemon basil, colantro, onions, and olive oil. I sauted the onions in the olive oil first, then added the rest. I let it simmer on low, after brining it to a boil, for half an hour or so. I served it with sour cream to top, grated cheese, fresh chopped hard boiled eggs, and more chopped onions. All sorts of edible chopped peppers are also good, both in the soup, and as topping, as is a little garlic.

I made an easy tomato soup, too. I used a good roux, 1 tbsp. flour and 1 tbsp butter blended off a hot burner. I added milk, about 1 c, and let it all blend over a low fire, come to a boil, blend over a low fire. I added aobut 1/4 20 oz jar of marinara and/or vodka sauce for pasts, three or four chopped plumb tomatoes, with seeds. Onions, fresh lemon basil, chives, dried or fresh. Salt and pepper to taste. I let it simmer about half an hour, same as the bean soup. Before it is served, it is somtimes good with a pat of butter or a dollop of sour cream on top, but these are optional. We also love oyster crackers. I do similar things with pumpkin soup, either with canned pumpkin added in place of the tomatoes and sauce, or with my own pureed pumpkins when I Have them. The Moosewood Restaurant has an awesome recipe, too.

A day later, I added more vodka sauce and about 2 tbsp water to the saved tomato soup, and made pasta sauce.

Have a wonderful fall, and remember to notice the maples are now turning red. Save a few leaves, admire the last of the mums and other flowers, and look for the late roses to bloom.

Sunday, September 11, 2011

9/11

I feel I must say something to commemorate the day, that I call "the worst day ever." We were not near any of the places hit; I was in class, teaching my college kids literature, when the latecomers came running in with the story of a plane hitting the World Trade Center. We went on a few minutes, and then the second sotry came of the second plane, and we sent to the student lounge. We are a samll school; I was the academic dean, and only I and a couple of teachers and the school psychologist were there. At least five kids went running for their phones; someone in their families worked at the Pentagon, or were near Ground Zero. The girl next to me was shaking uncontrollably; her husband was supposed to be near Ground Zero for a conference. She couldn't reach him by phone. That afternoon, she discovered he hadn't gone to the conferenc that day, and had rented a car to drive home.

The brother of one of my colleagues we learned later, died in one of the towers. My cousin by marriage, a day trader, was talking to colleagues and friends in Cantor Fitzgerald when the phone died. Many of them apparently did not come out. And, the girl who owns my favorite yarn shop across the street from work was a survivor; she had worked in the towers.

I thought of my Dad, who had been there late in 1976. He wanted to take me there to see the Towers; he said there were stores full of dolls from many countries. I thought of an ad I had seen the week before; there was a photo of the towers, with the caption "something will happen on September 11th." They meant they were introducing a new computer software. Little did they, and we know.

As soon as I could, I did what I always did in times of crisis; I called my mother. I had called her in 1993 when the first attack on the twin towers took place, when the Challenger exploded, when Oklahoma City was bombed, and during the Columbine disaster. I wanted to call her today; I can't. She died three years ago. That first Christmas, we joined others and bought RWB ornaments, and little fire fighter and police dolls. At the stores, others were buying them, too, and they said, as we chose what to buy, " we have to buy them; someone has to do something."

Today, may we think on those who lost their lives, and on those who have died since in the wars that have ensued. Bless them and their families and friends who have survived. There is no closure for grief; only memories, only rembrance. That, we will always have. May God Bless all of us who live in this world, even those who sadly see this as a day of celebration. Little do they know. Maybe someone can forgive them, for they know not what they do, either. Above all, God Bless the Union, and God Bless the United States. Have a thoughtful, safe, and careful day today, September 11, 2011.

Friday, September 2, 2011

Writing World September; May Recirculate

Enjoy:

W R I T I N G W O R L D

A World of Writing Information - For Writers Around the World

http://www.writing-world.com

Issue 11:17 12,722 subscribers September 1, 2011
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MANAGE YOUR SUBSCRIPTION: See the bottom of this newsletter for
details on how to subscribe, unsubscribe, or contact the editors.
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IN THIS ISSUE:
=================================================================

THE EDITOR'S DESK: The Best Laid Plans, by Moira Allen
THE INQUIRING WRITER: Submitting Online Work to Contests,
by Dawn Copeman
NEWS FROM THE WORLD OF WRITING
FEATURE: I Love You, My Little Cabbage: Using Foreign Words in
Your Fiction, by Cora Bresciano
COLUMN: Free Stuff for Writers: Summer's Over... I Hope,
by Aline Lechaye
THE WRITE SITES -- Online Resources for Writers
The Author's Bookshelf

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Writing.Com is the online community for writers of all interests.
Create your free online portfolio and start writing today!
---> http://wwx.Writing.Com/ <--- Become a fan on Facebook: http://facebook.com/WritingCom Follow us on Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/WritingCom **************************************************************** WRITERSCOLLEGE.COM has 57 online courses. Prices are low. If you can reach our web site, you can take our courses. http://www.WritersCollege.com ***************************************************************** WRITE FOR CHILDREN. Achieve your dream of becoming a published author. Writing books and stories for children is a great place to start. Learn the secrets 1-on-1 from a pro writer. Train online or by mail. Free Test offered. http://www.writingforchildren.com/H0514 ***************************************************************** You CAN Make a Great Full-Time Living As a Writer! Once you know the simple secrets of writing for this little-known lucrative market. You can work from home, be in control of your schedule and earn an average of $75-$150 an hour. http://www.thewriterslife.com/a63/full-time-living ***************************************************************** THOUSANDS OF WRITERS USE FANSTORY.COM FOR: * Feedback. Get feedback for every poem and story that you write. * Contests. Over 40 contests are always open and free to enter. * Rankings. Statistics will show you how your writing is doing. http://www.fanstory.com/index1.jsp?at=38 ***************************************************************** FROM THE EDITOR'S DESK ================================================================= The Best Laid Plans... This wasn't the editorial I PLANNED to write. But then, it hasn't been the week I planned to have. On Tuesday, for example, I planned a day dedicated to writing. (Well, OK, plus a few games of "Jewel Quest Heritage, expert level" -- but MOSTLY writing.) That plan fell apart when the house began to shake. And shake. As I calmly strolled outdoors to watch my plants doing a little dance on the deck, I could hear things toppling from shelves throughout the house. Fortunately, only my nerves were shattered! Now, I'm a California girl, so I'm no stranger to quakes. Unfortunately, that means I know that if a quake keeps going (or worse, pauses and then starts up stronger than before), that could mean trouble. Fortunately, it didn't. And since this was the worst quake on the East Coast since 1897, I wasn't too worried about a recurrence. But I found it tough to focus on writing for the rest of the day. Thursday, I meant to write when we came home from dinner at Don Pablo's -- and found myself, instead, waiting in the car for the AAA truck to come along and jumpstart our battery, while hoping that the ominous clouds wouldn't cut loose JUST yet because we'd managed to roll down the windows and now couldn't roll them up again. Today I'm pulling patio furniture off the deck to prepare for a possible hurricane. (Though, in all fairness, it looks like we may only get hit by a "severe tropical storm...") Granted, most of my weeks aren't like this, and I hope yours aren't either! But it doesn't take earthquakes and hurricanes to disrupt our lives. My sister, for example, has been plagued for two weeks with equipment failures that are preventing her from running her own home business; each new "fix" seems to bring a new set of problems. What does this have to do with writing, other than the admission that I haven't been doing a lot of that this week? Simply this: I know too many folks who are waiting to START writing when their PLANS come together. As soon as I do this... As soon as I get that project squared away... When I get all those things marked off my to-do list... When I'm past this difficult stage/phase/era of my life... When the kids are gone... When I retire... But as the commercial says, "Life comes at you fast." One minute you look like Fabio and the next... Well, like Fabio in old-man makeup. The problem with plans is that something ALWAYS manages to make things take longer than you planned. That set of errands that you thought would take one hour ends up taking three. A child gets sick and you spend the day in a waiting room. The car breaks down. The computer breaks down. Or you get to the keyboard at the end of the day and realize YOU'RE about to break down. The problem is two-fold. First, we have a tendency to "plan" to write AFTER something else. I'll write AFTER I finish this project, help my child with her homework, do the floors, do the dishes, do the shopping, have a cup of coffee, do my exercise. (Well, admittedly, since it's as easy for me to postpone exercise as writing, I do make an effort to put that FIRST.) The point is, we are forever putting writing SECOND. The other half of the problem is a mirror of the first: We are experts at finding something, anything to do INSTEAD of writing. After all, we need to eat, so the grocery shopping must get done, right? My child's homework is due tomorrow. My paying assignment is due tomorrow. I need to exercise. The floor is a mess. It's true that there will always be something else that needs doing. Conversely, there will ALWAYS be something else that needs doing. (I know, that sounded like the same statement, but it isn't. Quite.) In short, we always plan to write "after" -- but we always manage to find something else to do "before." Here's another way to visualize the problem. Imagine you have two boxes on your desk, "A" and "B." In Box A is a single sheet of paper describing the writing project you want to tackle: A story, a poem, a novel, whatever. In Box B is everything else -- a sheet of paper for every task, project, distraction and recreational activity in your day or week. Needless to say, THAT stack is pretty tall! Chances are, when you look at the two boxes, Box A seems "optional" compared to all the tasks clamoring from Box B. I'll get to it, you tell yourself, just as soon as Box B is whittled to a manageable size. Only Box B never "whittles." No matter what you subtract, things are always being added. But the only thing getting added to Box A is a growing layer of dust. It's easy to dismiss this as a "classic definition of procrastination," but it's also life. Box B will never, ever be empty. If it were, you'd be dead. Since dying is not an effective writing strategy, something else needs to change. The only approach I know of is to change one word in your vocabulary: Change "after" to "before." Instead of saying, "I'll get to my writing AFTER I do X," say "before." I will write BEFORE I start the laundry. I will write BEFORE I go to the grocery store. (The food will still be there!) I will write BEFORE playing Jewel Quest. I will record that TV show and write BEFORE I watch it. It doesn't mean that the tasks in Box B get postponed forever. But imagine what would happen if, instead of "planning" to spend an hour on Box B and then, "afterwards," start to write, you wrote for an hour first? All that other stuff would still get done. But by switching to writing "before" rather than "after," your story might actually get done as well! -- Moira Allen, Editor P.S. The Editor extends heartfelt wishes to readers who have experienced outages or damage from Hurricane Irene. She is happy to report that she emerged unscathed, but suspects many of our readers may not be able to say the same. ***************************************************************** CHILDREN'S WRITERS Read by over 1,000 children's book and magazine editors, this monthly newsletter can be your own personal source of editors' wants and needs, market tips, and professional insights. Get 2 FREE issues to start. http://www.thechildrenswriter.com/AK114 ***************************************************************** The Inquiring Writer: Submitting Online Work to Contests ================================================================= By Dawn Copeman Last month our question came from Barb Joy. She wrote: "I was thinking about submitting a short story or two to a writing contest but hesitated because I already have them on my website, although I haven't sold any yet. "Would it be unethical to send off a story I had on my website?" Hmm, this is a tricky one. I remember when I ran NewbieWriters we had a forum where you could post work in progress for review and critique. One member was most indignant to learn that because he had posted his work on the site it had been thrown out of a contest he had entered. But this isn't always the case. "It depends on the rules of the contest," advised Derek Thompson. "Sometimes the rules specifically state that any entry cannot have been published before either in print or online. That takes care of that. "However, there is nothing to prevent you taking a story you've posted online (especially one that you've received constructive feedback for) and rewriting it as something new. Bear in mind that if you enter a contest it is possible that the judges may do a quick web search for the finalists." Connie Berridge writes: "As a writer with several of my works on my website I think it would be perfectly okay to submit anything on your site. "You are the author and it is your site, which you have purchased. You may want to write to ask the contest site for guidance. It is like the case of SIMSUBS (simultaneous submissions). Some sites do not care as long as you report to them if the item has been picked up by another. A simple note to that effect is much appreciated. "If you have not sold the particular story, and used it primarily only on your site I do not see a problem. But it is just my opinion. I would ask the site their view before submitting or include a note with the submission that the story has not been sold and is only in print on your website. "Each site may vary in its decision." I would advise anyone who is entering their work into a contest to first of all find out if they will or won't accept work that has been published anywhere online, on your site or on a critique site. If they won't accept that piece, then rework it into something new. Don't think that just because it's hidden away in a huge blog or critique site that the contest judges won't find it -- if the work is online when it shouldn't be, they will find out. Personally, this is why I would only ever put excerpts of work onto sites for critique. Now, onto this month's question, which comes from Vanessa. She is intrigued by the whole idea of using a pseudonym for her writing and wants to know how other writers do it. She wrote: "How do you pay the taxes with different names? Must they be separate? How do you keep your identity private and separate when you are sending things via e-mail? Do you have different e-mail accounts in different pseudonyms? How do you keep it all straight with different pseudonym e-mail addresses?" So if you're a writer who uses a pseudonym Vanessa could use your help. Email your replies with the subject line: "Inquiring Writer" to editorial@writing-world.com. Also, I am running out of questions too. So if you want to put a question to our community, email me that to the same address. Until next time, Dawn Copyright 2011 Dawn Copeman **************************************************************** BEGINNERS! LEARN THE BASICS of writing for magazines and online publishers FREE from an experienced freelancer. Learn how to find ideas & markets, write queries that sell and get paid for your writing. Sign-up for free weekly writing tips. http://www.freelance-write-now.com ***************************************************************** NEWS FROM THE WORLD OF WRITING ================================================================= Forbes Lists World's Richest Authors ------------------------------------ Even though sales of hardcover books are falling, the top-earning authors are continuing to rake in the money, mainly due to increased e-book sales. To find out who is on the 'rich' list, visit: http://tinyurl.com/3lgmjzq Debut Author Joins Kindle Million Club -------------------------------------- Kathryn Stockett, whose first novel "The Help" is currently in the New York Bestseller list, has now also joined the Kindle Million club. The Kindle Million club is only for authors who have sold over 1 million copies in Amazon's Kindle Store. For more on this story visit: http://tinyurl.com/3uuhdhl Amazon Launches Daily Kindle Deal ---------------------------------- Visitors to the sites Kindle page will find a different book on offer every day. The page lists the title, a brief description of the book, the full price, the discounted price and how many hours are left until the deal ends. For more on this story visit: http://publishingperspectives.com/2011/08/amazon-offers-a-daily-e-book-deal/ ***************************************************************** EVERYHING YOU NEED TO KNOW ABOUT SETTING FREELANCE FEES! Find out how to negotiate agreements, choose pricing strategies, define tasks, deal with difficult customers, and much more in "What to Charge: Pricing Strategies for Freelancers and Consultants" (2nd Edition) by Laurie Lewis. In print and Kindle from Amazon at http://tinyurl.com/setyourfees *************************************************************** Writing Jobs and Opportunities ================================================================= Fellowship Opportunities at Vermont Studio Center -------------------------------------------------- We are excited to announce the following fellowship awards available at our upcoming October 3rd deadline. All are welcome to apply; **applications must be received by October 3, 2011**. [NOTE: We have posted only those fellowships open to writers, and that are not limited to a small regional area; other fellowships for visual artists and regional writers are also available.--Editor] Vermont Studio Center Fellowships --------------------------------- (http://www.vermontstudiocenter.org/fellowships) Sixteen merit-based fellowships open to all visual artists and writers. Educational Foundation of America Fellowships --------------------------------------------- (http://www.efaw.org/index.html) Three merit-based fellowships available to emerging and mid-career artists and writers of color from the United States. Rona Jaffe Foundation Fellowship ---------------------------------- (http://www.ronajaffefoundation.org) One fellowship for an emerging woman writer who will be a first-time resident at VSC. This award includes a stipend of $1250 to help cover expenses associated with taking the residency, including but not limited to travel, rent, childcare or to replace lost income. Sustainable Arts Foundation Fellowship ----------------------------------------- (http://www.sustainableartsfoundation.org) One fellowship for an artist or writer who is raising young children; this award includes a $2,000 stipend to cover lost income, travel, child care, or other costs related to taking time away from the family. In addition to the VSC application form, applicants should submit a copy of a tax return (or other documentation) showing dependents under the age of 18. John Pavlis Fellowships ----------------------- Three awards for African-American visual artists and writers, with preference given to current students and recent graduates of Fisk University, Spelman or Morehouse Colleges. 9/11: 10 YEARS LATER + HOW DO YOU REMEMBER? ------------------------------------------- PenTales is collecting 119 original perspectives on 9/11. 10 years later we want to know: How do you remember it? Do you remember? Where were you when it happened? Does the day matter, then or now? Does remembering do any good? What does the day say about America and Americans? How has it shaped the first decade of the new millennium? How has it shaped you? We're accepting: -video (max. 1 minute) -photography (max. 2 images with short caption) -text (max. 500 words) Send in your submission to writepentales@gmail.com with the following in the subject line: "9/11, your name and location." We're accepting works until September 11, 2011 midnight. We'll present works in numerical order as they come in. Each featured piece will be introduced by our editors and the most original submissions compiled into a larger collection. http://www.pentales.com New Literary Press Open to Submissions -------------------------------------- Big Wonderful Press accepts many different types of submissions. Some categories have reading fees and some do not. This helps us support the website and author services/promotion. We often offer feedback on submissions, but cannot guarantee that we always will have comments for every manuscript. Before submitting, please read the About Big Wonderful Press page. http://www.bigwonderfulpress.com/submissions/ ***************************************************************** HOW TO WRITE YOUR BEST STORY. This inspiring, practical new book will help you write your best story and improve your chances to get published. These are the most durable, successful, and time-tested tips, techniques, and examples of best practices used by great writers. http://www.amazon.com/How-Write-Your-Best-Story/dp/1933987146 *************************************************************** FEATURE: I Love You, My Little Cabbage: Using Foreign Words in Your Fiction =============================================================== By Cora Bresciano When I was a child, my French-Canadian mother called me her little chou (pronounced "shoe"). In the summers, when we visited our French-speaking family in Quebec, my cousins were called chou or chou-chou by their mothers, as well. One summer evening, though, my aunt used the word chou as she was enticing us with the menu for that evening's dinner. I understood that haricots verts were green beans and pommes de terre were potatoes, but chou? Which food was her darling? I turned to my mother, who smiled wryly. "The cabbage," she replied. "Chou means 'cabbage.'" All that time, I had been my mother's little cabbage. This episode comes back to me whenever I set out to infuse my writing with a taste of the foreign. When our fiction is set in another country or our characters speak other languages, we have the opportunity to use foreign words and phrases to enhance our writing, to establish a real sense of place, to create an atmosphere that is distinctly not American. But how much do we include? How much do we translate? And what do we do with expressions like "my little cabbage" that are authentic in another language, but sound awfully strange in English? We want our readers to know that a foreign language is being spoken; we want to impart the flavor and rhythms of the foreign tongue. But we need to be understood, as well. We don't want readers to lose anything or to become irritated with a story because they're stumped by our use of foreign words. Let's say you've set your story in Italy. Your fictional heroine, Jennifer, is an American sculptor who's been living in Rome for the past ten years. She speaks Italian in her everyday life. When you write her dialogue, when you capture her neighbors chatting over the fence or the baker selling her bread, how do you remind your readers that these characters are speaking Italian? Here are six ways to do it: 1. Write some key words and phrases in the foreign language, but offer the English translation. Here's the scenario: Jennifer's favorite baker finds something sticking out of the fresh loaf of bread that he's about to hand her. You can capture the atmosphere of the scene by having him utter a short phrase in Italian. Then translate it for those readers who won't understand it. "C'é una chiave!" Sergio cried out in disbelief. It's a key! He held it up to the light. This approach offers the best of both worlds: authenticity and clarity. We get the real thing with the Italian, but if we can't understand what it means, we need only to read on a little further to find it translated for us. The reader gets to have the experience of the Italian language without feeling inadequate or frustrated. 2. Write some words and phrases in the foreign language, and don't translate them. Some simple foreign words are well-known to many English speakers. Hello, goodbye, thank you -- most of us remember these from our high school language classes. Consider sprinkling them through your chapters just as they are: "Buon giorno!" Jennifer's landlord called out a hearty greeting as he passed her on the stairs. Your reader will almost surely understand this brief bit of Italian, if only from all the Scorcese films she's seen. And even if you were writing in a less common language than Italian, your description of the phrase as a "hearty greeting" would clue the reader in. 3. Translate literally some unusual foreign expressions. This strategy needs to be handled carefully, though, to avoid sounding comical when you don't mean to. If I were to write a tender scene, in English, between my five-year old self and my French-speaking mother, I probably wouldn't have her call me her little cabbage and just leave it at that. Who could read that without laughing? What I might do is explain the use of the term earlier in the story, so that at the tender moment, I could write something like: She tousled my hair and tucked me into bed. "Goodnight, my little cabbage," she whispered as she turned off the light. This use of an unusual word that has already been explained would let the readers see it as a sweet endearment rather than as a strange epithet. It might, therefore, evoke smiles rather than guffaws, while reminding us that Maman is actually speaking français. 4. Infuse the cadence and the syntax of the foreign language into the dialogue that you write in English. Even when creating long stretches of dialogue that need to be written completely in English, you can keep the feel of the foreign language by incorporating some of its differences into the English. For example, the French usually use the pronoun on, or "one," rather than ils/elles ("they") or nous ("we"). So when Jennifer attends an opening of her work in Paris, the gallery owner might say to her at the celebratory dinner: "Does one eat head of veal in the United States?" This captures the cadence of the French and emphasizes that it is not really English that's being spoken. Asking "does one eat" in French doesn't have the formality that it does in English -- it's a perfectly casual expression. (And "head of veal" is a direct translation of tête de veau, one of the more exotic French dishes.) The simple practice of omitting contractions -- which other languages tend not to have -- from the dialogue that's supposed to be in another language also can make it sound "foreign." "Jennifer, do not cry!" Giuseppina hugged the sobbing sculptor. "This critic, he knows nothing about art!" Substituting "do not" for "don't" gives these lines an Italian feel. And in English, we would more likely say "This critic knows..." Saying "This critic, he knows..." mimics the Italian syntax. Though we're reading in English, this sort of phrasing reminds us that we're not in Kansas anymore. 5. Enhance the dialogue with descriptions of non-verbal communication. Being half Italian, I'm well acquainted with the Italian need to use hand gestures to communicate. Other cultures have similar propensities -- gestures, facial expressions, ways of moving the body that express what words cannot and that mark their exhibitors as being of a particular nationality. Include these non-verbal cues when you write dialogue in order to paint a clearer -- and more colorful -- picture of the foreign scene. For example, Jennifer's next-door neighbor might show his appreciation of the red wine she brings him like this: "He tasted the wine, then closed his eyes and brought the fingertips of his right hand together, touched them to his lips, gave them a kiss and let them burst apart from each other. The classic Italian gesture of deep appreciation, for food, for beauty, for love." As you can see, the non-verbal communication does a good job of substituting for a spoken line of dialogue. And it imparts a very Italian feel at the same time. 6. Write long passages in the foreign tongue; translate nothing. Okay, this is not a method I condone as a writer. Or appreciate as a reader. But it's precisely what Umberto Eco does. The author of The Name of the Rose regularly includes in his books passages written in Latin, Hebrew, and Greek -- and offers no translations. Of course, he is Umberto Eco, world-famous author and scholar, and he can pretty much do what he wants in print -- but I always find myself frustrated by his indifference to those of us who don't speak all the languages he does. For example, he ends the introduction to his famous book with a quotation in untranslated Latin: "In omnibus requiem quaesivi, et nusquam inveni nisi in angulo cum libro." Today, with the help of the Internet, you can find this quotation by Thomas à Kempis online. When I read the novel for the first time, though, in the late eighties, I had no idea what it meant, and no way to find out. And that's a shame, because when you do know, it ends the section nicely and it's also important and pertinent to the rest of the novel. The translation is: "I have searched for peace everywhere, but have not found it anywhere except in a corner with a book." Like Eco, you could, if you really wanted, leave things like this untranslated -- it is your story, after all, and if you want to be ornery or experimental, go ahead -- but as a general rule, I wouldn't suggest it. Hopefully our use of foreign words, phrases, and references to dear little cabbages will provide our readers with enjoyment, if not peace -- and at the very least, won't cause them confusion or frustration when they curl up in a corner with our books. >>--------------------------------------------------<< Cora is the Co-Founder and Co-Executive Director of Blue Planet Writers' Room, a non-profit organization that integrates the arts, technology, and international collaboration into the teaching of writing. Cora's own writing encompasses both fiction and non-fiction; her children's musicals have been produced in Florida and New York, and her short story, "The Mermaid," won the 2008 Brogan Award in Fiction. She earned her MFA in Creative Writing from Florida Atlantic University. Having grown up in a family of immigrants from two different countries, in a house where three languages were spoken, Cora has a special interest in writing about the spaces where cultures and languages meet. Copyright 2011 Cora Bresciano For more information on writing dialogue visit: http://www.writing-world.com/fiction/greenway6.shtml **************************************************************** EBOOK SELF-PUBLISHING EXPLAINED An epublishing revolution is sweeping the industry. We explain what is happening and show you how to self-publish your own ebooks. http://www.PublishYourOwnEbooks.com *************************************************************** Free Stuff for Writers: Summer's Over... I Hope =============================================================== By Aline Lechaye I'm glad that autumn is coming. Inspiration-wise, summer is probably the worst season for me. It's hot, the sun is shining, and all I want to do is hang out at the beach and read some book someone else has written. (Yeah, yeah, any excuse...) A tip for anyone out there who hates writing in summer: paste one of your writing samples into the analyzer at http://iwl.me/ and see which famous writer you write like. I don't know how accurate the results actually are, but it's hard not to feel inspired when it says you write like, say, Ernest Hemmingway. If you thought that you could only read "old" books for free on the internet, think again. I was surprised too when I stumbled across http://www.readanybook.com, a site that lets you read books for free online. Offerings include "The Host" by Stephenie Meyer, "The Lost Symbol" by Dan Brown, and the entire "Harry Potter" series. The site has its own online e-reader device (it looks like a miniature Kindle, but you can widen it to full screen) for displaying books. The main drawback of the e-reader is that it seems to mess up the page layouts, making words and sentences run together or end awkwardly. Hey Publisher sounds like the name of a writer created rock band, but it's actually a website that connects writers with publishers. Signing up for a writer account is free and once you have your writer's profile set up, you can upload your work (Hey Publisher uses Amazon-provided servers, and they have a 100% guarantee that no uploaded work will ever be lost -- impressive!), browse publishers, and submit your work. You'll receive email updates on the status of your submitted manuscripts, so you don't have to worry about accidentally missing an acceptance letter. Get started at http://heypublisher.com/ Backing up files has become more important in recent years, especially for writers. There's nothing more painful or frustrating than staying up all night working on an article and then coming back in the morning to find that your hard drive has decided not to work. Mozy (say it nice and slow and just enjoy how that sounds!) provides you with 2GB of space for free, and encrypts your files during backup and storage so that other users can't access them. The iPhone/Android app makes it easy to access your files anywhere. You can also schedule automatic backups. Find out more at https://mozy.com/home/free/. Author Lisa Angelettie's website has three marketing-related freebies that you'll want to look at if you're an article writer: A marketing e-course, an article success toolkit, and "The 3 Simple Secrets to Making Money Using Articles" report. Download at http://lisaangelettieblog.com/resources/. A friend sent me a link to http://www.the39dollarexperiment.com/. I confess I find the blogger's approach to getting free stuff novel. Basically, the $39 dollar experiment is a guy using thirty-nine dollars' worth of stamps to send a hundred letters to various companies asking for free stuff. Freebies he's received back include coupons, compressed air, teabags, and lip balm. He estimates that in total he's gotten about $272 in free products from companies like Carmex, Campbell's and Nestle. Interesting, but not something you'd quit your day job for! >>--------------------------------------------------<<

Aline Lechaye is a translator, writer, and writing tutor who
resides in Asia. She can be reached at alinelechaye@gmail.com.

Copyright 2011 Aline Lechaye

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THE WRITE SITES
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A Blogger's Books
-----------------
This is a great site for all bloggers and would-be bloggers. It
includes tips and hints on how to blog, resources and tutorials as
well as advice as to where to submit your blogs.
http://www.abloggersbooks.com/

Down the Tubes - How to write graphic novels
--------------------------------------------
Tips and advice on how to write for graphic novels from a former
editor at Marvel UK.
http://www.downthetubes.net/writing_comics/index.html

Worldbuilder Projects
---------------------
A site for fantasy novelists, this site helps you to find the tools
you need to create your fantasy worlds.
http://hiddenway.tripod.com/world/

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Copyright 2011 Moira Allen
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IN THIS ISSUE:
=================================================================

THE EDITOR'S DESK: The Best Laid Plans, by Moira Allen
THE INQUIRING WRITER: Submitting Online Work to Contests,
by Dawn Copeman
NEWS FROM THE WORLD OF WRITING
FEATURE: I Love You, My Little Cabbage: Using Foreign Words in
Your Fiction, by Cora Bresciano
COLUMN: Free Stuff for Writers: Summer's Over... I Hope,
by Aline Lechaye
THE WRITE SITES -- Online Resources for Writers
The Author's Bookshelf

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---> http://wwx.Writing.Com/ <--- Become a fan on Facebook: http://facebook.com/WritingCom Follow us on Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/WritingCom **************************************************************** WRITERSCOLLEGE.COM has 57 online courses. Prices are low. If you can reach our web site, you can take our courses. http://www.WritersCollege.com ***************************************************************** WRITE FOR CHILDREN. Achieve your dream of becoming a published author. Writing books and stories for children is a great place to start. Learn the secrets 1-on-1 from a pro writer. Train online or by mail. Free Test offered. http://www.writingforchildren.com/H0514 ***************************************************************** You CAN Make a Great Full-Time Living As a Writer! Once you know the simple secrets of writing for this little-known lucrative market. You can work from home, be in control of your schedule and earn an average of $75-$150 an hour. http://www.thewriterslife.com/a63/full-time-living ***************************************************************** THOUSANDS OF WRITERS USE FANSTORY.COM FOR: * Feedback. Get feedback for every poem and story that you write. * Contests. Over 40 contests are always open and free to enter. * Rankings. Statistics will show you how your writing is doing. http://www.fanstory.com/index1.jsp?at=38 ***************************************************************** FROM THE EDITOR'S DESK ================================================================= The Best Laid Plans... This wasn't the editorial I PLANNED to write. But then, it hasn't been the week I planned to have. On Tuesday, for example, I planned a day dedicated to writing. (Well, OK, plus a few games of "Jewel Quest Heritage, expert level" -- but MOSTLY writing.) That plan fell apart when the house began to shake. And shake. As I calmly strolled outdoors to watch my plants doing a little dance on the deck, I could hear things toppling from shelves throughout the house. Fortunately, only my nerves were shattered! Now, I'm a California girl, so I'm no stranger to quakes. Unfortunately, that means I know that if a quake keeps going (or worse, pauses and then starts up stronger than before), that could mean trouble. Fortunately, it didn't. And since this was the worst quake on the East Coast since 1897, I wasn't too worried about a recurrence. But I found it tough to focus on writing for the rest of the day. Thursday, I meant to write when we came home from dinner at Don Pablo's -- and found myself, instead, waiting in the car for the AAA truck to come along and jumpstart our battery, while hoping that the ominous clouds wouldn't cut loose JUST yet because we'd managed to roll down the windows and now couldn't roll them up again. Today I'm pulling patio furniture off the deck to prepare for a possible hurricane. (Though, in all fairness, it looks like we may only get hit by a "severe tropical storm...") Granted, most of my weeks aren't like this, and I hope yours aren't either! But it doesn't take earthquakes and hurricanes to disrupt our lives. My sister, for example, has been plagued for two weeks with equipment failures that are preventing her from running her own home business; each new "fix" seems to bring a new set of problems. What does this have to do with writing, other than the admission that I haven't been doing a lot of that this week? Simply this: I know too many folks who are waiting to START writing when their PLANS come together. As soon as I do this... As soon as I get that project squared away... When I get all those things marked off my to-do list... When I'm past this difficult stage/phase/era of my life... When the kids are gone... When I retire... But as the commercial says, "Life comes at you fast." One minute you look like Fabio and the next... Well, like Fabio in old-man makeup. The problem with plans is that something ALWAYS manages to make things take longer than you planned. That set of errands that you thought would take one hour ends up taking three. A child gets sick and you spend the day in a waiting room. The car breaks down. The computer breaks down. Or you get to the keyboard at the end of the day and realize YOU'RE about to break down. The problem is two-fold. First, we have a tendency to "plan" to write AFTER something else. I'll write AFTER I finish this project, help my child with her homework, do the floors, do the dishes, do the shopping, have a cup of coffee, do my exercise. (Well, admittedly, since it's as easy for me to postpone exercise as writing, I do make an effort to put that FIRST.) The point is, we are forever putting writing SECOND. The other half of the problem is a mirror of the first: We are experts at finding something, anything to do INSTEAD of writing. After all, we need to eat, so the grocery shopping must get done, right? My child's homework is due tomorrow. My paying assignment is due tomorrow. I need to exercise. The floor is a mess. It's true that there will always be something else that needs doing. Conversely, there will ALWAYS be something else that needs doing. (I know, that sounded like the same statement, but it isn't. Quite.) In short, we always plan to write "after" -- but we always manage to find something else to do "before." Here's another way to visualize the problem. Imagine you have two boxes on your desk, "A" and "B." In Box A is a single sheet of paper describing the writing project you want to tackle: A story, a poem, a novel, whatever. In Box B is everything else -- a sheet of paper for every task, project, distraction and recreational activity in your day or week. Needless to say, THAT stack is pretty tall! Chances are, when you look at the two boxes, Box A seems "optional" compared to all the tasks clamoring from Box B. I'll get to it, you tell yourself, just as soon as Box B is whittled to a manageable size. Only Box B never "whittles." No matter what you subtract, things are always being added. But the only thing getting added to Box A is a growing layer of dust. It's easy to dismiss this as a "classic definition of procrastination," but it's also life. Box B will never, ever be empty. If it were, you'd be dead. Since dying is not an effective writing strategy, something else needs to change. The only approach I know of is to change one word in your vocabulary: Change "after" to "before." Instead of saying, "I'll get to my writing AFTER I do X," say "before." I will write BEFORE I start the laundry. I will write BEFORE I go to the grocery store. (The food will still be there!) I will write BEFORE playing Jewel Quest. I will record that TV show and write BEFORE I watch it. It doesn't mean that the tasks in Box B get postponed forever. But imagine what would happen if, instead of "planning" to spend an hour on Box B and then, "afterwards," start to write, you wrote for an hour first? All that other stuff would still get done. But by switching to writing "before" rather than "after," your story might actually get done as well! -- Moira Allen, Editor P.S. The Editor extends heartfelt wishes to readers who have experienced outages or damage from Hurricane Irene. She is happy to report that she emerged unscathed, but suspects many of our readers may not be able to say the same. ***************************************************************** CHILDREN'S WRITERS Read by over 1,000 children's book and magazine editors, this monthly newsletter can be your own personal source of editors' wants and needs, market tips, and professional insights. Get 2 FREE issues to start. http://www.thechildrenswriter.com/AK114 ***************************************************************** The Inquiring Writer: Submitting Online Work to Contests ================================================================= By Dawn Copeman Last month our question came from Barb Joy. She wrote: "I was thinking about submitting a short story or two to a writing contest but hesitated because I already have them on my website, although I haven't sold any yet. "Would it be unethical to send off a story I had on my website?" Hmm, this is a tricky one. I remember when I ran NewbieWriters we had a forum where you could post work in progress for review and critique. One member was most indignant to learn that because he had posted his work on the site it had been thrown out of a contest he had entered. But this isn't always the case. "It depends on the rules of the contest," advised Derek Thompson. "Sometimes the rules specifically state that any entry cannot have been published before either in print or online. That takes care of that. "However, there is nothing to prevent you taking a story you've posted online (especially one that you've received constructive feedback for) and rewriting it as something new. Bear in mind that if you enter a contest it is possible that the judges may do a quick web search for the finalists." Connie Berridge writes: "As a writer with several of my works on my website I think it would be perfectly okay to submit anything on your site. "You are the author and it is your site, which you have purchased. You may want to write to ask the contest site for guidance. It is like the case of SIMSUBS (simultaneous submissions). Some sites do not care as long as you report to them if the item has been picked up by another. A simple note to that effect is much appreciated. "If you have not sold the particular story, and used it primarily only on your site I do not see a problem. But it is just my opinion. I would ask the site their view before submitting or include a note with the submission that the story has not been sold and is only in print on your website. "Each site may vary in its decision." I would advise anyone who is entering their work into a contest to first of all find out if they will or won't accept work that has been published anywhere online, on your site or on a critique site. If they won't accept that piece, then rework it into something new. Don't think that just because it's hidden away in a huge blog or critique site that the contest judges won't find it -- if the work is online when it shouldn't be, they will find out. Personally, this is why I would only ever put excerpts of work onto sites for critique. Now, onto this month's question, which comes from Vanessa. She is intrigued by the whole idea of using a pseudonym for her writing and wants to know how other writers do it. She wrote: "How do you pay the taxes with different names? Must they be separate? How do you keep your identity private and separate when you are sending things via e-mail? Do you have different e-mail accounts in different pseudonyms? How do you keep it all straight with different pseudonym e-mail addresses?" So if you're a writer who uses a pseudonym Vanessa could use your help. Email your replies with the subject line: "Inquiring Writer" to editorial@writing-world.com. Also, I am running out of questions too. So if you want to put a question to our community, email me that to the same address. Until next time, Dawn Copyright 2011 Dawn Copeman **************************************************************** BEGINNERS! LEARN THE BASICS of writing for magazines and online publishers FREE from an experienced freelancer. Learn how to find ideas & markets, write queries that sell and get paid for your writing. Sign-up for free weekly writing tips. http://www.freelance-write-now.com ***************************************************************** NEWS FROM THE WORLD OF WRITING ================================================================= Forbes Lists World's Richest Authors ------------------------------------ Even though sales of hardcover books are falling, the top-earning authors are continuing to rake in the money, mainly due to increased e-book sales. To find out who is on the 'rich' list, visit: http://tinyurl.com/3lgmjzq Debut Author Joins Kindle Million Club -------------------------------------- Kathryn Stockett, whose first novel "The Help" is currently in the New York Bestseller list, has now also joined the Kindle Million club. The Kindle Million club is only for authors who have sold over 1 million copies in Amazon's Kindle Store. For more on this story visit: http://tinyurl.com/3uuhdhl Amazon Launches Daily Kindle Deal ---------------------------------- Visitors to the sites Kindle page will find a different book on offer every day. The page lists the title, a brief description of the book, the full price, the discounted price and how many hours are left until the deal ends. For more on this story visit: http://publishingperspectives.com/2011/08/amazon-offers-a-daily-e-book-deal/ ***************************************************************** EVERYHING YOU NEED TO KNOW ABOUT SETTING FREELANCE FEES! Find out how to negotiate agreements, choose pricing strategies, define tasks, deal with difficult customers, and much more in "What to Charge: Pricing Strategies for Freelancers and Consultants" (2nd Edition) by Laurie Lewis. In print and Kindle from Amazon at http://tinyurl.com/setyourfees *************************************************************** Writing Jobs and Opportunities ================================================================= Fellowship Opportunities at Vermont Studio Center -------------------------------------------------- We are excited to announce the following fellowship awards available at our upcoming October 3rd deadline. All are welcome to apply; **applications must be received by October 3, 2011**. [NOTE: We have posted only those fellowships open to writers, and that are not limited to a small regional area; other fellowships for visual artists and regional writers are also available.--Editor] Vermont Studio Center Fellowships --------------------------------- (http://www.vermontstudiocenter.org/fellowships) Sixteen merit-based fellowships open to all visual artists and writers. Educational Foundation of America Fellowships --------------------------------------------- (http://www.efaw.org/index.html) Three merit-based fellowships available to emerging and mid-career artists and writers of color from the United States. Rona Jaffe Foundation Fellowship ---------------------------------- (http://www.ronajaffefoundation.org) One fellowship for an emerging woman writer who will be a first-time resident at VSC. This award includes a stipend of $1250 to help cover expenses associated with taking the residency, including but not limited to travel, rent, childcare or to replace lost income. Sustainable Arts Foundation Fellowship ----------------------------------------- (http://www.sustainableartsfoundation.org) One fellowship for an artist or writer who is raising young children; this award includes a $2,000 stipend to cover lost income, travel, child care, or other costs related to taking time away from the family. In addition to the VSC application form, applicants should submit a copy of a tax return (or other documentation) showing dependents under the age of 18. John Pavlis Fellowships ----------------------- Three awards for African-American visual artists and writers, with preference given to current students and recent graduates of Fisk University, Spelman or Morehouse Colleges. 9/11: 10 YEARS LATER + HOW DO YOU REMEMBER? ------------------------------------------- PenTales is collecting 119 original perspectives on 9/11. 10 years later we want to know: How do you remember it? Do you remember? Where were you when it happened? Does the day matter, then or now? Does remembering do any good? What does the day say about America and Americans? How has it shaped the first decade of the new millennium? How has it shaped you? We're accepting: -video (max. 1 minute) -photography (max. 2 images with short caption) -text (max. 500 words) Send in your submission to writepentales@gmail.com with the following in the subject line: "9/11, your name and location." We're accepting works until September 11, 2011 midnight. We'll present works in numerical order as they come in. Each featured piece will be introduced by our editors and the most original submissions compiled into a larger collection. http://www.pentales.com New Literary Press Open to Submissions -------------------------------------- Big Wonderful Press accepts many different types of submissions. Some categories have reading fees and some do not. This helps us support the website and author services/promotion. We often offer feedback on submissions, but cannot guarantee that we always will have comments for every manuscript. Before submitting, please read the About Big Wonderful Press page. http://www.bigwonderfulpress.com/submissions/ ***************************************************************** HOW TO WRITE YOUR BEST STORY. This inspiring, practical new book will help you write your best story and improve your chances to get published. These are the most durable, successful, and time-tested tips, techniques, and examples of best practices used by great writers. http://www.amazon.com/How-Write-Your-Best-Story/dp/1933987146 *************************************************************** FEATURE: I Love You, My Little Cabbage: Using Foreign Words in Your Fiction =============================================================== By Cora Bresciano When I was a child, my French-Canadian mother called me her little chou (pronounced "shoe"). In the summers, when we visited our French-speaking family in Quebec, my cousins were called chou or chou-chou by their mothers, as well. One summer evening, though, my aunt used the word chou as she was enticing us with the menu for that evening's dinner. I understood that haricots verts were green beans and pommes de terre were potatoes, but chou? Which food was her darling? I turned to my mother, who smiled wryly. "The cabbage," she replied. "Chou means 'cabbage.'" All that time, I had been my mother's little cabbage. This episode comes back to me whenever I set out to infuse my writing with a taste of the foreign. When our fiction is set in another country or our characters speak other languages, we have the opportunity to use foreign words and phrases to enhance our writing, to establish a real sense of place, to create an atmosphere that is distinctly not American. But how much do we include? How much do we translate? And what do we do with expressions like "my little cabbage" that are authentic in another language, but sound awfully strange in English? We want our readers to know that a foreign language is being spoken; we want to impart the flavor and rhythms of the foreign tongue. But we need to be understood, as well. We don't want readers to lose anything or to become irritated with a story because they're stumped by our use of foreign words. Let's say you've set your story in Italy. Your fictional heroine, Jennifer, is an American sculptor who's been living in Rome for the past ten years. She speaks Italian in her everyday life. When you write her dialogue, when you capture her neighbors chatting over the fence or the baker selling her bread, how do you remind your readers that these characters are speaking Italian? Here are six ways to do it: 1. Write some key words and phrases in the foreign language, but offer the English translation. Here's the scenario: Jennifer's favorite baker finds something sticking out of the fresh loaf of bread that he's about to hand her. You can capture the atmosphere of the scene by having him utter a short phrase in Italian. Then translate it for those readers who won't understand it. "C'é una chiave!" Sergio cried out in disbelief. It's a key! He held it up to the light. This approach offers the best of both worlds: authenticity and clarity. We get the real thing with the Italian, but if we can't understand what it means, we need only to read on a little further to find it translated for us. The reader gets to have the experience of the Italian language without feeling inadequate or frustrated. 2. Write some words and phrases in the foreign language, and don't translate them. Some simple foreign words are well-known to many English speakers. Hello, goodbye, thank you -- most of us remember these from our high school language classes. Consider sprinkling them through your chapters just as they are: "Buon giorno!" Jennifer's landlord called out a hearty greeting as he passed her on the stairs. Your reader will almost surely understand this brief bit of Italian, if only from all the Scorcese films she's seen. And even if you were writing in a less common language than Italian, your description of the phrase as a "hearty greeting" would clue the reader in. 3. Translate literally some unusual foreign expressions. This strategy needs to be handled carefully, though, to avoid sounding comical when you don't mean to. If I were to write a tender scene, in English, between my five-year old self and my French-speaking mother, I probably wouldn't have her call me her little cabbage and just leave it at that. Who could read that without laughing? What I might do is explain the use of the term earlier in the story, so that at the tender moment, I could write something like: She tousled my hair and tucked me into bed. "Goodnight, my little cabbage," she whispered as she turned off the light. This use of an unusual word that has already been explained would let the readers see it as a sweet endearment rather than as a strange epithet. It might, therefore, evoke smiles rather than guffaws, while reminding us that Maman is actually speaking français. 4. Infuse the cadence and the syntax of the foreign language into the dialogue that you write in English. Even when creating long stretches of dialogue that need to be written completely in English, you can keep the feel of the foreign language by incorporating some of its differences into the English. For example, the French usually use the pronoun on, or "one," rather than ils/elles ("they") or nous ("we"). So when Jennifer attends an opening of her work in Paris, the gallery owner might say to her at the celebratory dinner: "Does one eat head of veal in the United States?" This captures the cadence of the French and emphasizes that it is not really English that's being spoken. Asking "does one eat" in French doesn't have the formality that it does in English -- it's a perfectly casual expression. (And "head of veal" is a direct translation of tête de veau, one of the more exotic French dishes.) The simple practice of omitting contractions -- which other languages tend not to have -- from the dialogue that's supposed to be in another language also can make it sound "foreign." "Jennifer, do not cry!" Giuseppina hugged the sobbing sculptor. "This critic, he knows nothing about art!" Substituting "do not" for "don't" gives these lines an Italian feel. And in English, we would more likely say "This critic knows..." Saying "This critic, he knows..." mimics the Italian syntax. Though we're reading in English, this sort of phrasing reminds us that we're not in Kansas anymore. 5. Enhance the dialogue with descriptions of non-verbal communication. Being half Italian, I'm well acquainted with the Italian need to use hand gestures to communicate. Other cultures have similar propensities -- gestures, facial expressions, ways of moving the body that express what words cannot and that mark their exhibitors as being of a particular nationality. Include these non-verbal cues when you write dialogue in order to paint a clearer -- and more colorful -- picture of the foreign scene. For example, Jennifer's next-door neighbor might show his appreciation of the red wine she brings him like this: "He tasted the wine, then closed his eyes and brought the fingertips of his right hand together, touched them to his lips, gave them a kiss and let them burst apart from each other. The classic Italian gesture of deep appreciation, for food, for beauty, for love." As you can see, the non-verbal communication does a good job of substituting for a spoken line of dialogue. And it imparts a very Italian feel at the same time. 6. Write long passages in the foreign tongue; translate nothing. Okay, this is not a method I condone as a writer. Or appreciate as a reader. But it's precisely what Umberto Eco does. The author of The Name of the Rose regularly includes in his books passages written in Latin, Hebrew, and Greek -- and offers no translations. Of course, he is Umberto Eco, world-famous author and scholar, and he can pretty much do what he wants in print -- but I always find myself frustrated by his indifference to those of us who don't speak all the languages he does. For example, he ends the introduction to his famous book with a quotation in untranslated Latin: "In omnibus requiem quaesivi, et nusquam inveni nisi in angulo cum libro." Today, with the help of the Internet, you can find this quotation by Thomas à Kempis online. When I read the novel for the first time, though, in the late eighties, I had no idea what it meant, and no way to find out. And that's a shame, because when you do know, it ends the section nicely and it's also important and pertinent to the rest of the novel. The translation is: "I have searched for peace everywhere, but have not found it anywhere except in a corner with a book." Like Eco, you could, if you really wanted, leave things like this untranslated -- it is your story, after all, and if you want to be ornery or experimental, go ahead -- but as a general rule, I wouldn't suggest it. Hopefully our use of foreign words, phrases, and references to dear little cabbages will provide our readers with enjoyment, if not peace -- and at the very least, won't cause them confusion or frustration when they curl up in a corner with our books. >>--------------------------------------------------<< Cora is the Co-Founder and Co-Executive Director of Blue Planet Writers' Room, a non-profit organization that integrates the arts, technology, and international collaboration into the teaching of writing. Cora's own writing encompasses both fiction and non-fiction; her children's musicals have been produced in Florida and New York, and her short story, "The Mermaid," won the 2008 Brogan Award in Fiction. She earned her MFA in Creative Writing from Florida Atlantic University. Having grown up in a family of immigrants from two different countries, in a house where three languages were spoken, Cora has a special interest in writing about the spaces where cultures and languages meet. Copyright 2011 Cora Bresciano For more information on writing dialogue visit: http://www.writing-world.com/fiction/greenway6.shtml **************************************************************** EBOOK SELF-PUBLISHING EXPLAINED An epublishing revolution is sweeping the industry. We explain what is happening and show you how to self-publish your own ebooks. http://www.PublishYourOwnEbooks.com *************************************************************** Free Stuff for Writers: Summer's Over... I Hope =============================================================== By Aline Lechaye I'm glad that autumn is coming. Inspiration-wise, summer is probably the worst season for me. It's hot, the sun is shining, and all I want to do is hang out at the beach and read some book someone else has written. (Yeah, yeah, any excuse...) A tip for anyone out there who hates writing in summer: paste one of your writing samples into the analyzer at http://iwl.me/ and see which famous writer you write like. I don't know how accurate the results actually are, but it's hard not to feel inspired when it says you write like, say, Ernest Hemmingway. If you thought that you could only read "old" books for free on the internet, think again. I was surprised too when I stumbled across http://www.readanybook.com, a site that lets you read books for free online. Offerings include "The Host" by Stephenie Meyer, "The Lost Symbol" by Dan Brown, and the entire "Harry Potter" series. The site has its own online e-reader device (it looks like a miniature Kindle, but you can widen it to full screen) for displaying books. The main drawback of the e-reader is that it seems to mess up the page layouts, making words and sentences run together or end awkwardly. Hey Publisher sounds like the name of a writer created rock band, but it's actually a website that connects writers with publishers. Signing up for a writer account is free and once you have your writer's profile set up, you can upload your work (Hey Publisher uses Amazon-provided servers, and they have a 100% guarantee that no uploaded work will ever be lost -- impressive!), browse publishers, and submit your work. You'll receive email updates on the status of your submitted manuscripts, so you don't have to worry about accidentally missing an acceptance letter. Get started at http://heypublisher.com/ Backing up files has become more important in recent years, especially for writers. There's nothing more painful or frustrating than staying up all night working on an article and then coming back in the morning to find that your hard drive has decided not to work. Mozy (say it nice and slow and just enjoy how that sounds!) provides you with 2GB of space for free, and encrypts your files during backup and storage so that other users can't access them. The iPhone/Android app makes it easy to access your files anywhere. You can also schedule automatic backups. Find out more at https://mozy.com/home/free/. Author Lisa Angelettie's website has three marketing-related freebies that you'll want to look at if you're an article writer: A marketing e-course, an article success toolkit, and "The 3 Simple Secrets to Making Money Using Articles" report. Download at http://lisaangelettieblog.com/resources/. A friend sent me a link to http://www.the39dollarexperiment.com/. I confess I find the blogger's approach to getting free stuff novel. Basically, the $39 dollar experiment is a guy using thirty-nine dollars' worth of stamps to send a hundred letters to various companies asking for free stuff. Freebies he's received back include coupons, compressed air, teabags, and lip balm. He estimates that in total he's gotten about $272 in free products from companies like Carmex, Campbell's and Nestle. Interesting, but not something you'd quit your day job for! >>--------------------------------------------------<<

Aline Lechaye is a translator, writer, and writing tutor who
resides in Asia. She can be reached at alinelechaye@gmail.com.

Copyright 2011 Aline Lechaye

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THE WRITE SITES
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A Blogger's Books
-----------------
This is a great site for all bloggers and would-be bloggers. It
includes tips and hints on how to blog, resources and tutorials as
well as advice as to where to submit your blogs.
http://www.abloggersbooks.com/

Down the Tubes - How to write graphic novels
--------------------------------------------
Tips and advice on how to write for graphic novels from a former
editor at Marvel UK.
http://www.downthetubes.net/writing_comics/index.html

Worldbuilder Projects
---------------------
A site for fantasy novelists, this site helps you to find the tools
you need to create your fantasy worlds.
http://hiddenway.tripod.com/world/

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